California Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery (CalRecycle) 

 

Questions and Answers: Food Waste Prevention and Rescue Grant Program (FY 2016-17) 

Questions about the Food Waste Prevention and Rescue Grant Program grant application were accepted in writing only, no later than June 28, 2017. Similar or related questions were grouped together or reworded for clarity and responded to as one question.

The question and answer period is now closed. All questions and answers are posted on this site.

General

  1. What is food waste prevention software?

    Food waste prevention software tracks food purchases and residuals for restaurants, cafeterias, institutions, or other businesses who serve large quantities of food. The software can assist entities to examine their food storage and implement efficient practices like purchasing the correct amounts and types of food, tracking expiration dates, matching menus with food purchases, and other activities that result in food waste prevention.

  2. Could you give us an example of partnerships that would work for this grant?

    The following are several examples of Food Waste Prevention and Rescue Grant Program partnerships:

    • Food recovery organizations working collectively with food generators to expand their ability to collect and distribute food
    • Local Governments coordinating food waste prevention activities with food generators to reduce food waste
    • School Districts or colleges/universities working together to increase food recovery on-site or in conjunction with food recovery organizations
    • Food distributors coordinating with food recovery organizations to increase food otherwise destined for disposal
  3. Do you have a list of past funded projects I can look at for this grant?

    No. The Food Waste Prevention and Rescue Grant Program is a new CalRecycle grant program.

  4. The scoring criteria states, to refer to the Air Resources Board (ARB); however, it is not clear which link we are supposed to refer to. Can you please provide me with some guidance?

    The Waste Diversion GHG Emission Reduction Calculator Tool is a required application document and is located at ARB’s Cap-and-Trade Auction Proceeds Quantification Materials page. Scroll down to the Natural Resources and Waste Diversion section, find the Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery (CalRecycle) under Agency/Department, and select corresponding link. This calculator is an Excel spreadsheet that contains numerous tabs; select the Food tab for the Food Waste Prevention and Rescue Program. Please refer to the ARB FY 2016-17 Waste Diversion GHG Emission Reduction Calculator Tool section on page 13 of the Application Guidelines and Instructions.

  5. Are there advantages to having a non-profit apply on behalf of the cities and the larger area?

    No.

  6. The instructions refer to “Audit/Records Access Section in Terms and Conditions (Exhibit A)” of the Grant Agreement. What are the audit requirements/procedures associated with a grant?

    Grantees must maintain records and supporting documentation pertaining to the performance of the grant subject to possible audit for a minimum of three (3) years after final payment date or Grant Term end date, whichever is later. The State of California has the right to review the project documents and conduct audits during project implementation and over the project life (2017-2026). Please refer to Audit Considerations section on page 14 of the Procedure and Requirements.

  7. Is the grant period for one year or two?

    The Grant Term begins on the date of the Notice to Proceed email, which is sent after the grant is awarded and the grant agreement is fully executed. The Grant Term ends on April 1, 2020. Please refer to Grant Term section on page 6 of the Application Guidelines and Instructions.

  8. If grants are tentatively awarded in October or November 2017, is our program expected to start at that time?

    The Grant Term begins on the date of the Notice to Proceed (NTP) email and ends on April 1, 2020. All eligible program costs can be incurred anytime during this timeframe. Please refer to Grant Term section on page 6 of the Application Guidelines and Instructions.

  9. Will there be another round of funding that we could potentially apply for, as it says "1st cycle" on the application guidelines?

    At this time funding, program criteria, scoring, and eligibility are not approved for future Food Waste Prevention and Rescue Grant Program cycles.

  10. Are grantees subject to an annual state audit? If so, will co-applicants be subject to an annual state audit, or just the lead applicant?

    The State of California has the right to review the project documents and conduct audits during project implementation and over the project life (2017-2026). The participants listed in the application are subject to the same requirement. Please see Audit Considerations section on page 14 of the Procedure and Requirements.

Eligibility

  1. For K-12 school districts, can cafeterias be considered if diverting food?

    Yes. Schools may adjust the ordering for their cafeteria (implementation software) to measure reduction results, change operation processes to divert more food from waste, and/or partner with outside organizations to develop a greater impact (community wide) with greater diversion. Projects must show that food waste has been prevented and/or rescued and not discarded.

  2. Can for-profit businesses apply for the Food Waste Prevention and Rescue Grant Program?

    Yes, for-profit entities are eligible to apply. The business must be qualified to do business in California and be in good standing with all applicable California state agencies, including, but not limited to, the Secretary of State and the Franchise Tax Board. Please refer to Eligible Applicants section on page 4 of the Application Guidelines and Instructions.

  3. The guidelines specify that only two applications per qualifying entity will be accepted for this program. Eligible applicants include “University of California (UC) campuses, California State University (CSU) campuses, or California Community Colleges.” For applications from UC campuses, for instance, is the application limit per UC campus (e.g., up to two from UC Berkeley, up two from UC Davis), or does CalRecycle only permit two applications from across the UC system?

    The criteria was revised for this cycle to allow two applications per campus, not UC wide.

  4. Would a non-profit private University be eligible for the Food Waste Prevention and Recovery grant?

    Yes.

  5. Will past, current and future financial statements need to be submitted by all grant partners, or just the lead agency? Similarly, the application packet states that we will need working capital greater than or equal to the quarterly project cost. Does this refer to the lead agency only or the combination of partners?

    This is only applicable to the Lead Applicant. Please refer to Cooperative Application Requirements section on page 5 of the Application Guidelines and Instructions.

  6. Would a $250,000 grant be available to purchase an on-site, dehydration solution for food waste reduction, at a farm, be eligible for a lettuce farmer who generates 1 ton per day of lettuce waste?

    No, an on-site dehydration solution for food waste reduction is not eligible. Please see Ineligible Costs section on pages 6 & 7 of the Application Guidelines and Instructions.

  7. Are food waste liquefiers an eligible expense?

    No.

  8. California State Universities (CSU) are bounded by California Assembly Bill (AB) 20, which mandates that contracts and some grants between any California State Agency and any California State University (CSU) or University of California (UC) campus are now governed by the AB 20 negotiated terms and conditions. In addition to a number of standard contract clauses, these include a minimum Indirect Cost rate of 25 percent of Modified Total Direct Costs (this cost base excludes equipment over $5,000 per item, facilities rental costs, sub-award costs over $25,000, and participant support costs).

    I do not see any information on your website that indicates that this program would be exempt. Could you please clarify whether this program is exempt from AB 20 (in which case we would submit a proposal with the Indirect Cost rate stated in the Application Guide), or if we should move forward under AB 20 (in which case we would submit a proposal with the Indirect Cost rate mandated by AB 20)?

    A grant provided as part of the Food Waste Prevention and Rescue Grant Program is not a contract within the definition of Education Code section 67325, therefore the various AB 20 requirements are not applicable.  All terms, including those relating to indirect costs, are as noted in the Procedures and Requirements and Terms and Conditions documents for the grant.

  9. To what extent is it expected that a project deliver a “ready-to-go” solution to be implemented during the project period? We were hoping to request funds to develop novel and highly innovative technologies for sustainable waste removal/transformation, however, we do not envision being able to produce an operational system within a three-year project period. Is it possible within this funding program to develop new technologies?

    New technologies may be developed but this competitive grant program requires projects to result in permanent, annual, and measurable reductions in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions attributed to the production, processing, packaging, distribution, and landfilling of California-generated food materials and increases in quantity (tons) of California-generated food materials, newly diverted from landfill and prevented or rescued from disposal. The application must demonstrate that project will reduce GHG emissions by the end of the grant term, therefore the new technology must be functional during the grant term.

  10. How do you envision addressing the tons of food waste? We can predict how much of this particular food waste we would be able to biotransform based on our sustainable (insect-based) technologies but we obviously cannot “know” precisely how much food waste will be removed from the waste stream within the project period and beyond. Similarly, we cannot accurately predict how much greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions will be reduced. How likely is it that projects will deliver solutions, which are adopted by industries and waste management facilities–is that the intent of this scoring criterion?

    Applicants must demonstrate reduced food waste either through food waste prevention projects or food rescue projects. The project that you mention in your question to biotransform food waste would most likely not qualify under this grant program. If this project were to qualify however, the tonnage must be supported with documentation such as contracts, letters of support, and letters of commitment that provide confidence to the tonnage claims being made. Applicants should demonstrate through the implemented project that permanent, annual, and measurable GHG emission reductions will occur.

  11. When comparing the organization size of your applicants, how would projects qualify under the small tier category?

    The grant amount requested will determine the project tier and is not based on the size of the organization. Applicants should evaluate their project needs and determine appropriate costs for their grants budget.

  12. Are composting projects eligible for the Food Waste Prevention and Rescue Grant Program?

    Composting projects are not be eligible for the Food Waste Prevention and Rescue Grant Program. Composting projects are eligible under our Organics Grant Program. Applications for the fiscal year 2016-17 Organics Grant Program were due on March 16, 2017.

  13. Could this grant fund a small on site anaerobic digester as it diverts food waste from the landfill and reduces methane production on landfills? In addition, could this grant fund bins for compost pick-up (post-consumer) that would be collected and taken to an on-site composter or hauled to a compost facility?

    Anaerobic digestion projects are not be eligible for the Food Waste Prevention and Rescue Grant Program. Anaerobic digestion projects are eligible under our Organics Grant Program. Applications for the fiscal year 2016-17 Organics Grant Program were due on March 16, 2017.

    Compost bins are not an eligible cost for the Food Waste Prevention and Rescue Grant Program, however, bins for transporting edible food for feeding people is an eligible expense. 

  14. Will the number of applications per University of California campuses rule be upheld for the next grant cycle or is there a possibility that it will be changed?

    Funding, program criteria, scoring, and eligibility are not approved for future Food Waste Prevention and Rescue Grant Program cycles. If future funding becomes available, CalRecycle will solicit stakeholder feedback before finalizing program criteria and eligibility.

  15. We are investigating the possibility of creating a food waste prevention program that would capture vegetative food waste as it is being generated during the kitchen preparation process and turn it into compost. This proposed program would divert food waste from being generated and instead compost on property and reused by the facility. Can you confirm that this type of a proposed project would qualify?

    Composting projects and expenses related to composting are not eligible under the Food Waste Prevention and Rescue grant, however, food waste residuals from the project must be sent to composting or digestion when available within the project service area. Compost projects are eligible under our Organics Grant Program. Applications for the fiscal year 2016-17 Organics Grant Program were due on March 16, 2017.

  16. Can the applicant use grant funds to purchase equipment and place it at locations where they distribute food, outside their organization?

    The Lead Participant may order a piece of equipment for a participating organization, as long as the equipment is vital to the grant project. All participating entities must be included as a part of either a Cooperative or Regional application. Cooperative and Regional applicants are considered grantees once awarded. It is incumbent that the lead grantee be involved with the purchasing of equipment and work with each partner to ensure equipment purchases are eligible. Applicants must describe this relationship in the application and identify all equipment purchases in the budget.

  17. We are a consulting business that focuses entirely on organic (food scrap) recycling, with the purpose of assisting municipalities to divert organic material from the landfill. Would we qualify for this grant based upon the nature of this business?

    For the project to be eligible it must reduce greenhouse gas emissions attributed to the production, processing, packaging, distribution, and landfilling of California-generated food materials; and increases in quantity (tons) of California-generated food materials, newly diverted from landfill and prevented or rescued from disposal. “Newly diverted” means the tons of materials that are currently being landfilled that will instead be diverted because of this project. Please see Eligible Applicants section on page 4 and Project Requirements section on page 5 of the Application Guidelines and Instructions.

  18. Would a project that diverts food waste from compost (thereby reducing greenhouse gas emissions created by composting) and distributes salvageable food to underserved communities be eligible?

    Eligible feedstock for this grant program is food that was normally destined for landfill, not another beneficial use such as compost. Eligible food waste prevention projects prevent food waste from being generated and becoming waste normally destined for landfills, with any food waste residuals from the project being sent to a composting or digestion when available within the project service area. Food rescue projects rescue food and distribute it to people, with any food waste residual from the project being sent to composting or digestion with available within the project service area.

  19. Would building a food waste processing center that would take food waste from a Commercial Franchise Contract, process that waste (eliminating it from landfills) and generating a cake or slurry that would ultimately be taken to a digester for final processing be eligible for this program?

    No, the project as described is not eligible for this grant program. The aim of the program is to prevent food from becoming waste in the first place, also known as source reduction. Eligible projects are food waste projects that prevent food waste from being generated and becoming a waste normally destined for landfills, with any food waste residuals from the project being sent to composting or digestion when available within project service area. Food rescue projects result in food being distributed to people, with any food waste residuals from the project being sent to a composting or digestion when available within the project service area. Please refer to Eligible Projects section on page 5 of the Application Guidelines and Instructions.

  20. Are feasibility studies eligible for funding under the Food Waste Prevention and Rescue Grant Program? We have a client that is interested in performing a feasibility study for the anaerobic digestion of food waste and was curious if that project might eligible under this grant program.

    Feasibility studies are not eligible under this grant program.

  21. Would a program that takes expired food or food scraps produced during food preparation and converts it to biofuel be considered an eligible project? This project would divert these food materials out of the waste stream and landfill.

    No, the project as described is not eligible for this grant program. The aim of the program is to prevent food from becoming waste in the first place, also known as source reduction. Eligible projects are food waste prevention projects that prevent food waste from being generated and becoming a waste normally destined for landfills, with any food waste residuals from the project being sent to composting or digestion when available within project service area. Food rescue projects result in food being distributed to people, with any food waste residuals from the project being sent to a composting or digestion when available within the project service area. Please refer to Eligible Projects section on page 5 of the Application Guidelines and Instructions.

  22. Would the diversion of additional used cooking oil and grease for recycling be considered as an eligible project?

    No.

  23. Is the food packaging considered part of the food waste diverted?

    No. This grant program is focused on the amount of food prevented or rescued and therefore the food packaging is not counted. However, if you are able to quantify how much of the packaging can be diverted from landfills, please provide this information in the Project Summary of the Narrative Proposal if space allows.

  24. If a food rescue project involving animal feed meets both Project Requirements as stated in the Application Guidelines and Instructions, can it be added as an eligible project?

    No.

  25. I see in your Question & Answer webpage that composting projects are not eligible for this grant. The bulk of our project would be to collect and divert food waste and rescue food, however, the unused portion would go to a small composting organization that would then use the compost as an educational tool for students. The composting itself would not be an expense to the grant. Does this mean that composting may not be part of the project at all?

    The project as described may be eligible for this grant program. Eligible projects include food rescue projects result in food being distributed to people, with any food waste residuals from the project being sent to a composting or digestion when available within the project service area. Composting can be part of the project; however, the cost of supporting the composting is not a reimbursable expense for this grant program. Please refer to Eligible Projects section on page 5 of the Application Guidelines and Instructions.

  26. Would the cost of the kitchen redesign be an eligible cost? This includes design and construction. Would the architect's time be included in the 25 percent labor cost or can that be included as the construction cost?

    Yes, kitchen redesign is an eligible cost if the project results in additional recovery of food that otherwise would have been landfilled. Eligible costs may include food preparation and cooking items such as ovens, ranges, etc. Please refer to Eligible Costs section on page 6 of the Application Guidelines and Instructions. The architect’s time would be included as construction cost (engineering costs). Please refer to Budget section on page 13 and 14 of the Application Guidelines and Instructions.

  27. Are grant funds eligible for residential food rescue projects? Many properties are not recovering all of their produce, and oftentimes this produce ends up in the landfill bin or green waste bin. Would a food recovery/gleaning program for residential properties be considered a food recovery program under the Food Waste Prevention and Rescue Grant Program?

    Food rescue projects must result in food being distributed to people, with any food waste residuals from the project being sent to a composting or digestion when available within the project service area. Please refer to Eligible Projects section on page 5 of the Application Guidelines and Instructions.

  28. First step of the project will involve getting a deeper understanding of our partners' capacity constraints and infrastructure needs. Can the infrastructure request in the budget change after project start?

    If awarded, budget and work plan modifications can occur upon request from the grantee however they must be approved by the grant manager before expenses are incurred or work is performed.

  29. Would CalRecycle consider awarding to entities who are clearly diverting waste away from landfills, but instead of sending residuals to composting or digestion, send it to animal farms to feed livestock?

    No.

Funding

  1. Is there a specific number of tons that would designate a project/application as a large or small tier?

    No. The funding tiers are solely based on the amount of funding requested.

  2. The scoring criteria appears to focus on/prioritize implementation of large-scale solutions, but the budget has to be between $100,000-$500,000 within a three-year project period. How do you envision a project both implementing a large-scale solution and also accurately monitor greenhouse gas reductions, monitor food quality and ensure food safety-within these budget and time constraints?

    Large tier refers to the larger award amount not the size of the project. CalRecycle grant funds may not cover all project costs. Applicants should evaluate their project needs and determine appropriate costs for their grant budget. The grant amount requested will determine the project tier. Large tier projects will be scored together, and separately, small tier projects will be scored together. Please see Funding and Evaluation and Scoring Process sections on page 5 of the Request for Approval.

    Each grantee must submit quarterly Progress Reports to document all grant activities including tonnage of food diverted from landfills, greenhouse gas reductions, and other associated activities and benefits from the project. Please see Reporting Requirements from page 7 to 11 of the Procedures and Requirements.

  3. If we were awarded a grant, but do not receive the full amount requested, do we need to move forward with the project as is? Alternatively, can the project scope be modified, including the budgeted expenses?

    It is up to the award recipient to determine if their project is still feasible with a reduced award amount. After the conditional award, grantees will work with CalRecycle staff to modify their budgets and work plans to match their award amount while maintaining the same overall project goals.

  4. Can funds be used to renovate or expand existing kitchens?

    Yes, if the project results in additional recovery of food that otherwise would have been landfilled.

  5. Can funds be used to build a standalone kitchen meal preparation and distribution center?

    Yes, if the project results in additional recovery of food that otherwise would have been landfilled. Eligible costs may include food preparation and cooking items such as ovens, ranges, etc. Please see Eligible Costs section on page 6 of the Application Guidelines and Instructions.

  6. Can grant funds be used to lease/rent building or buildings space like a kitchen?

    No, the purchase or lease of land or buildings is an ineligible cost. Please see Ineligible Costs section on pages 6 and 7 of the Application Guidelines and Instructions.

  7. Is purchasing or leasing a truck to transport rescued food an eligible cost?

    The purchase of vehicles such as refrigerated trucks is an eligible cost, however the leasing of vehicles is an ineligible cost.

  8. We are considering purchasing refrigeration equipment as part of our project, to build capacity to rescue food. If we are awarded a grant and during the project period, our participating entity obtains a new building (not with CalRecycle funds), would it be acceptable to install the equipment at a different location than what we originally proposed to CalRecycle?

    Yes, however, any project modifications during the grant term must be approved by the Grant Manager.

  9. I’d like to know at what scale of activity or impact is CalRecycle looking for. For example, we will start by serving 200 seniors at four affordable housing communities, recovering about 45-50 tons of food the first year. Over the next 6-12 months, we will increase the amount of food donors and food recipient sites; we are establishing those partnerships now. In the narrative, we would like to talk about where this pilot is starting and the plans for expansion over the next year. Is this approach something that fits within this grant program funding?

    Yes. The food must be California-generated food materials that would be destined to landfill if it were not rescued and distributed to people as a result of the Food Waste Prevention and Rescue Grant project. Please refer to the Project Requirements and the Eligible Projects sections on page 5 of the Application Guidelines and Instructions.

Application

  1. If a project includes a food pantry located outside a disadvantaged community that feeds people from a disadvantaged community, can we consider that eligible for disadvantaged community benefits?

    Yes.

  2. If an organization has multiple locations doing a food waste prevention or rescue project, do they submit separate applications?

    An organization may include multiple locations in one application however, an organization may submit up to two applications. Individual sites or project locations should be listed on the Sites tab of the application.

  3. Can a food waste prevention and rescue entity submit a cooperative application with several partners?

    Yes. One entity must be identified as the Lead Participant to act on behalf of the participating entities and up to three other participants, totaling no more than four participants. Please refer to the Eligible Applicants section on page 4 of the Application Guidelines and Instructions.

  4. The Application and Guidelines state, “The Financial Narrative and supporting documentation are required application documents for private, for-profit, and nonprofit organizations only.” Does these organizational categories encompass California State Universities?

    No. University of California campuses, California State University campuses, or California Community Colleges are not required to submit Financial Narrative and supporting documentation.

  5. Is it possible to see the application in its entirety as a PDF or other document?

    No. The application is only available via the Grant Management System (GMS). If you are unable to log into GMS or do not have computer access please contact us for assistance at 916-341-6117.

  6. In the Request for Approval, I believe it states that the Lead Applicant for a cooperative or regional application must be a non-governmental organization and that the non-governmental lead applicant will be among a maximum of four participants, of which two of the remaining three must be local government entities; is this correct? Can a county be the lead applicant?

    The Lead Participant does not need to be a non-governmental entity. A county may be a Lead Participant in either a Cooperative or Regional Application. A Cooperative Application may include private entities or private and public entities as partners in the project. A Regional Application consists of two or more local governments are partners. In a Cooperative or Regional Application, a Lead Participant must be designated to act on behalf of all participating entities (up to three). The Lead Participant is the applicant/grantee who will be responsible for the performance of the grant and all required documentation. CalRecycle will direct all official correspondence and grant payments to the Lead Participant. Please see the Cooperative and Regional Applications Requirements sections on page 5 of the Application Guidelines and Instructions.

  7. If I am not the lead person on the grant, can I still create an account in the Grant Management System (GMS) and log in to see what are all the pieces of the application that we have to complete? I have created an account, but when I went into the application, it asked me to fill out the info about my organization and put me as lead. Would it be okay to go on if I'm not the lead?

    Yes. Contacts may be given access to the application but do not need to be the primary contact or the Lead Applicant. Contact the lead applicant to add you as a contact and grant you access. Once you receive access, you will see the application listed under the “My Active Grant Applications” section.

  8. Our organization picks up excess food from food banks after they were not been able to feed people within the shelf life of the foods in question. We are rescuing food waste, but it is not fresh rescue. Do we qualify for any of the points attributable to “Tons of Food Waste Prevented or Rescued” described in the grant scoring documentation?

    Based on the information provided this project may not be eligible and would not receive any points in the Tons of Food Waste Prevented or Rescued section. Eligible feedstock for this grant program is food that was normally destined for landfills. Eligible food waste prevention projects prevent food waste from being generated and becoming waste normally destined for landfills, with any food waste residuals from the project being sent to a composting or digestion when available within the project service area. Food rescue projects rescue food and distribute it to people, with any food waste residual from the project being sent to composting or digestion with available within the project service area. Please see Eligible Projects section on page 5 of the Application Guidelines and Instructions.

  9. Does refrigeration include coolers (electric or “non-emission” ice chests) or similar equipment to prevent spoilage of transported food for field-based program work?

    For purposes of this grant program, refrigeration includes equipment that uses refrigerants in the cooling system. Ice chests that do not include refrigerant to maintain temperature do not need to be documented as refrigeration, but should be documented as storage.

  10. Does transportation include associated hard costs such as insurance, fuel, maintenance, modifications such as storage and shelving, costs of contracting a driver for the project period, global positioning systems (GPS) for project work or storage/parking costs for the vehicle?

    Transportation refers to the purchase of a vehicle and would be eligible under the grant program under the Vehicles sub-category within the Equipment budget category. Items such as insurance, fuel, GPS, and storage/parking costs for the vehicle are eligible but should be listed under the Maintenance budget category indirect costs under the Administrative Costs. Vehicle maintenance and modifications such as storage and shelving for the vehicle may fall under the Maintenance category as well. Contracting a driver for the project may fall under Personnel category. Please see Eligible Costs section on page 4 and Indirect Costs section on page 5 of the Procedures and Requirements. Also, please see budget examples on page 14 of the Application Guidelines and Instructions.

  11. Does salaries and outreach include the cost of contracting a service or person to provide a service? Is worker’s compensation expenses and associated payroll taxes considered eligible costs?

    Salaries fall under the Personnel category. Outreach may fall under the Education or Personnel category. If the project includes hiring a person to provide outreach, that would fall under Personnel. Purchasing materials to distribute for outreach would fall under Education.

    Worker’s compensation expenses are not an eligible cost but payroll expenses are eligible. Please see Eligible Costs section on page 6 and Budget section on pages 13 and 14 of the Application Guidelines and Instructions.

  12. Our program relies on several systems to maintain the base of food generators and our volunteer service engine. We use these systems to schedule and maintain data for both groups. Does this area cover the associated service costs that make the use of software and Software As A Service (SaaS) technology possible? Does hardware work in this category or should it go with equipment? How about Technology consulting? Can we use this category?

    Yes, software costs such as food waste online exchange and source reduction platforms are considered eligible. SaaS technology is considered eligible as long as the software directly aids the diversion of food materials. Please see additional details on software in the Eligible Costs section on page 4 of the Procedures and Requirements.

  13. We will need to cover accident and liability insurance for our volunteers. Do you consider this indirect? Would legal consulting for memorandums of understanding or contracts go with indirect or under salaries? Would we put any associated hard administrative costs here?

    Yes, insurance and legal consulting are indirect costs. Indirect costs fall under Administrative Costs category. Please see Indirect Costs section on page 5 and Budget section on page 13 and 14 of the Application Guidelines and Instructions.

  14. Many of our smaller receiving agencies have a need for devices such as juicers, food processors, or small scale edible food dehydrators to extend or diversify the life of the food for their clients. Would this grant allow for the purchase of processing devices to meet these ends in the equipment category?

    Juicers and food processors may be eligible if they contribute to additional food rescue or prevention. Food waste dehydrators and liquefiers are ineligible costs. Please see Eligible Costs and Ineligible Costs sections on pages 6 and 7 of the Application Guidelines and Instructions.

  15. Does the project have to meet all of verbiage outlined in the Application Guidelines and Instructions? For example, reductions in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions attributed to the production, processing, packaging, distribution, and landfilling of California-generated food materials.

    No, projects must reduce GHG emissions via any of the methods. The project must result in an increase in quantity (tons) of California-generated food materials newly diverted from landfill and prevented or rescued from disposal.

  16. On page 7 of the Application Guidelines and Instructions, it states that purchase or lease of land or buildings is an ineligible cost. On page 16, it states “If an applicant is planning to lease buildings for any part of their submitted project, you are required to upload a copy of the long-term lease evidencing your commitment to utilize the facility for the purpose set forth in the grant and your commitment to utilize the facility as described in the application for life of facility.” Can you please clarify if leasing a building is an eligible cost?

    Leasing a building is an ineligible cost and cannot be paid using grant funds. A lease agreement is required if an applicant is planning to lease a building for any part of their project using their own funding sources. CalRecycle staff will use the lease agreement to assess the likelihood of your project maintaining operations within the grant term.

  17. Can you please clarify what kind of certifications/credentials can be considered for community members? I read the information related to Trainings on page 9 of the Procedures and Requirements, but it does not clarify which types would be considered eligible or accepted. For example, we conduct cooking/nutrition classes and host trainings on Asset-Based Community Development principles and practices for residents of disadvantaged communities. Would these qualify?

    Training may include a person receiving on-the-job training involving the operation of a forklift at food bank and/or receiving their forklift certification. Other types of training may include receiving a food handling license, or people attending cooking/nutrition class and receiving a certification of completion. This is not an exhaustive list. Please articulate all training associated with your project.

  18. In the Application Guidelines and Instructions (page 5) states: “The Lead Participant must have working capital equal to or greater than the quarterly annual cost of the project”. In the Financial Narrative is says that “will be used to confirm that your business has adequate working capital equal to or greater than the quarterly and annual cost of the project.” Can you please clarify if we are required to have working capital of BOTH the annual and quarterly cost or just the quarterly cost?

    The Application Guidelines and Instructions are correct, “The Lead Applicant must have working capital equal or greater than the quarterly annual cost of the project.” The Financial Narrative is incorrect and has been corrected and reposted however, applicants should respond to question one detailing both the quarterly and annual costs for analysis purposes.

  19. On the Narrative Proposal, under the Net Tons of Newly Diverted Food Waste Prevented or Edible Food Rescued from Landfills section, Question 1 states, “In annual tons, state the amount of food that will be prevented from becoming waste and/or the amount of food that will be rescued and distributed to people.” The template provided by CalRecycle will accept a text response. Can we provide the amount and include a narrative explanation to this question? Alternatively, is CalRecycle just looking for a number in tons to answer this question?

    Provide the amount and you may include a narrative explanation.

  20. Our project provides benefits to a disadvantaged community of almost 90 census tracts. On the Disadvantaged Communities Summary on questions A and B, should we list all of these census tracts? Or just census tracts where the main office of the lead applicant and participating entity are located? On Question C, should we only list the census tract where the landfill is located?

    Provide all the census tracts of the disadvantaged communities that your project benefits on table A and B of the Disadvantaged Communities Summary document. For Table C, provide the census tract where the landfill is located.

  21. On the General Checklist of Business Permits, is the “Grant Number” the same as the “Grant Identification (ID)”? If not, which number do we enter?

    The Grant number and Grant ID are not the same. The Grant ID is a five-digit number generated when an application is started in the Grants Management System (GMS). The Grant ID can be located at the top of your application in GMS. A Grant number is assigned after grant award. Enter your Grant ID on the General Checklist of Business Permit.

  22. Do you have a Resolution example specific to the Food Waste Prevention and Rescue Grant Program? I only see example resolutions for other grant programs on the Resolution and Letter Examples webpage.

    The website has been updated to include the Food Waste Prevention and Rescue Grant Program.

  23. Can you please clarify how we should provide CalRecycle with “resumes of key project personnel and contractors” (as stated in the Work Plan template)? Should we provide resumes for personnel at participating entities? In addition, should they be merged with another document, or uploaded as a single compiled separate attachment of resumes?

    Provide and upload resumes of key person(s) and contractor(s) working and/or managing the project in single file and upload it to application using “Other” as the Document Type.

  24. On the Site(s) tab, how detailed do we need to be? For example, is it sufficient to list the office of the school district from where we plan to recover food?

    The Site(s) tab is to document project location and its operations. If a project operates with multiple sites, each project site must be documented in the Site(s) tab.

  25. On the Detail, should we choose all assembly/senate districts included in our project service area or just the Assembly and Senate district where the main office of the lead participant is located?

    Please select all applicable assembly and senate districts included in your service area. Multiple districts may be selected by holding the “ctrl” key.

  26. As a food recovery organization, what needs to be included in our Environmentally Preferable Purchases and Practices (EPPP) Policy?

    Please see Environmentally Preferable Purchases and Practices Policy Requirement section beginning on page 7 of the Application Guidelines and Instructions.

  27. Can you provide examples of greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions for each of the following: production, processing, packaging, and distribution?

    For more detail on the GHG emission reductions for food, we suggest reviewing the California’s Air Resources Board’s Cap-and-Trade Auction Proceeds Quantification Materials spreadsheet under the food tab. See the references at the bottom of the spreadsheet for background supporting these emission reductions. Keep in mind that for every ton of food waste prevented the calculator automatically calculates the emission reductions. For every ton of food rescued, this too is automated but you may have to answer some questions about refrigerants if applicable to your application.

  28. Can you provide an example for the project requirement involving quantity of food materials that are newly diverted?

    A grocery store has been sending fruits and vegetables to the landfill because customers are not purchasing these fruits and vegetables due their appearance. A food bank sees an opportunity to rescue the edible fruits and vegetables being disposed. The food bank collects the discarded produce to distribute to people in need thus, newly diverting food waste from a landfill.

  29. The solicitation states the following: “Food waste prevention projects that prevent food waste from being generated and becoming waste normally destined for landfills, with any food waste residuals from the project being sent to composting or digestion when available within the project service area.” Can a project be considered eligible if it “prevents food waste from being generated and becoming waste that would normally be destined for landfills” but uses an alternative diversion and processing method outside of composting and digestion but still achieves greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reductions in significant excess of that in composting?

    Food waste residuals from the project must be sent to either composting or digestion when available within the project service area. Other diversion and processing methods for food residuals are not eligible under this grant program.

  30. In the solicitation, the term “California-generated food materials” is used often to describe the feedstock. Does California-generated food materials apply to all food materials generated in-state?

    California-generated food materials apply to food materials that are only generated in the state of California.

  31. On the application form for disadvantaged communities, it asks to list landfills located in the disadvantaged communities. I see many landfills are closed, but can we list/include waste disposal sites as well?

    No, this only applies to new diversion of solid waste that is currently being disposed of in a landfill. It does not apply to diversion from other types of disposal sites such as transformation or engineered municipal solid waste conversion.

  32. Can you clarify if rent/lease of a building can be included under ‘indirect’ costs (capped at five percent of the total grant ask). Can you please distinguish between ‘lease’ and ‘rent’ per the instruction document (see below). Page 7 of the Application Guidelines and Instructions, under Ineligible Costs include: Purchase or lease of land or buildings. Page 14 of instructions: Indirect costs include but are not limited to administrative costs associated with rent, utilities, insurance, audits, and legal assistance.

    For purposes of this grant renting and leasing a building is treated the same and therefore rent is an ineligible cost. Listing rent as an example of indirect costs in the Application Guidelines and Instruction is incorrect for this grant and will be struck out of the document.

  33. Currently, our project includes a State Agency, a County Agency, a California State University (CSU) campus, and a non-profit. Which applicant type would we fall under? Would this be a cooperative application or a regional application?

    This would be a Cooperate Application because of the private (non-profit) and public (state agency, county agency, and CSU) entities joining in a cooperative grant agreement for the purposes of grant implementation.

  34. The application instructions state that the Lead Participant would receive all payments for the project. Does this mean that the Lead Applicant is therefore responsible for paying the other project partners?

    Yes, the lead participant is the applicant/grantee who will be responsible for the performance of the grant, all required documentation, and reimbursing the other participating entities. CalRecycle will direct all official correspondence and grant payments to the Lead Participant. All participating entities will be grantees. All entities involved with a cooperative application will be required to execute a grant agreement.

  35. Are there any specific requirements tied to historical financial statements, such as certification or audited financials?

    The historical finance statement(s) are not required to be certified or audited financials. The historical financial statements can be balance sheets, income statements or net worth reconciliation covering the last three fiscal years and the current year to date. Please see Financial Narrative and Documentation section on page 15 of the Application Guidelines and Instructions.

  36. When looking through the required documents, do all participants need to complete each document, or only the lead participant? For example, do all participants/grantees need to complete the CalRecycle 669 Permit Checklist?

    One entity must be identified as the Lead Participant to act on behalf of the participating entities. Only the Lead Participant will be responsible to complete all required application documents. Please see Cooperative Application Requirements section on page 5 of the Application Guidelines and Instructions.

  37. Does the total requested grant amount need to be equal to and not greater than the expenses budgeted for the project? In other words, the amount of the grant application must equal, and not exceed, the cost of the project.

    Yes. All of the amount of the Food Waste Prevention and Rescue Grant funds requested must be included in the project budget.

  38. If a partner in the grant decides to pay for grant-related services through a line item in their own grant budget, would this service provider be considered a ‘partner’ or a ‘subcontractor’? And would this subcontractor expense be considered part of the ‘salary’ budget (which would be included in the 25% requested grant amount of a large tier grant)? For example, if an agency is providing software and technical assistance, would the technical assistance support count toward the ‘salary’ line item?

    Regardless of if a service provider is considered a partner or subcontractor, technical assistance for software support is a salary expense and should be categorized under Personnel. Please refer the Budget section on page 13 and 14 of the Application Guidelines and Instructions.

  39. Can a Joint Powers Authority (JPA) submit any type of application (individual, cooperative or regional)?

    AJPA may submit a grant application as an individual applicant. However, an entity may not submit an individual application if that entity is also a member of an applicant JPA. A JPA may also partner with another organization as a cooperative or regional application. Please see Joint Powers Authority Requirements section on page 5 of the Application Guidelines and Instructions.

  40. If a Joint Powers Authority (JPA) submits an application, can it do so on behalf of entities that are not included in their membership?

    Yes, a JPA may also partner with another organization as a cooperative or regional application. Please see Joint Powers Authority Requirements section on page 5 of the Application Guidelines and Instructions.

  41. Does a Joint Powers Authority (JPA) need to be the Lead Agency in the proposal, or can they be considered a partner?

    No, a JPA does not need to be a lead participant in the proposal; however, one entity must be identified as the lead participant to act on behalf of all participating entities.

  42. If the project takes place in the state of California , are parts of salaries of staff that work remote outside of the state of California but focus on the California programs allowed to be included as part of the grant budget?

    The salaries paid by the Food Waste Prevention and Rescue Grant must be affiliated with the project and provide direct support to the project. Salaries are eligible to be paid as long as the employee(s) directly works on the project the grant is funding.

  43. Are vehicle costs such as fuel, insurance, lease payments, depreciation, parking permits eligible?

    Costs associated with vehicle maintenance are eligible under the maintenance budget category. Please refer the Budget section on page 13 and 14 of the Application Guidelines and Instructions.

  44. Is the 5 percent of indirect costs (which may cover salary overhead) not included with each tier’s cap or would it be included and then the cap would be reduced to 20 percent for large tier and 45 percent for smaller tier?

    Indirect Costs are not included in tier cap. Total indirect cost shall not exceed five percent of the total grant award. Please refer to Indirect Costs section on page 5 of the Application Guidelines and Instructions.

  45. Ineligible costs include purchase or lease of land or building. Does this mean we cannot charge any facility costs to grant? For example, if staff that are managing this grant have to allocate a percentage of their facility allocation use for programming needs, would it be acceptable? Or if we do purchase infrastructure such as refrigerated trucks or refrigerators/ovens, would we not be able to cover parking for trucks or facility expenses where infrastructure is located at?

    The costs of operating and maintaining facilities (with accounting services and administrative salaries) are example of indirect costs. Parking for trucks and other vehicle expenses are considered under the maintenance category and are not indirect costs. Indirect Cost shall not exceed five percent of the total grant award. Please refer to Indirect Costs section on page 5 of the Procedures and Requirements.

  46. In the application, it states salaries, public education, and/or outreach costs not exceeding: Twenty-five percent of the applicant's requested grant amount for large tier projects; Fifty percent of the applicant's requested grant amount for small tier projects. Do those percentages apply to each category? Salaries, public education, outreach costs, OR do those percentages apply to all of those categories as a whole?

    The combined amount of salaries, public education, and/or outreach costs cannot exceed twenty-five percent of the applicant’s requested grant amount for large tier projects and fifty percent of the applicant’s requested amount for small tier project. Please refer to Indirect Costs section on page 5 of the Application Guidelines and Instructions.

  47. Are matching funds required or recommended?

    Matching funds are not required but showing the project is financially sustainable is encouraged.

  48. Is there a minimum time period that the equipment purchased must be in use? Does equipment continue to exist as property of the applicant after the grant period ends?

    Yes, no less than five year after the end of the grant term. The grantee may not transfer Title without authorization of CalRecycle during that time. Please refer to the Real and Personal Property Acquired with Grant Funds section of the Terms and Conditions.

  49. If we have a nonprofit partner conducting outreach and training, could they be included in the Education category?

    No, the education category includes materials such as fliers, brochures, signs, etc. Persons conducting outreach or providing training would fall under Salaries category in the budget.

  50. If we have a food waste tracking company providing training, could they be included in the Education category?

    No, the education category includes materials such as fliers, brochures, signs, etc. Outreach and training would fall under Salaries budget category.

  51. f collaborating with a food waste tracking company, how can we allocate expenses such as hardware costs, shipping, software license costs, training, and site contracting fee expenses?

    Hardware and software costs would fall under Equipment category of the budget. Education category consists of materials such as fliers, brochures, signs needed for an event such as outreach. Person providing training would fall under Personnel category. Please refer to Budget section on page 13 and 14 of the Application Guidelines and Instructions.

  52. We are proposing to use CalRecycle funds to build a kitchen facility in a disadvantaged community, which would allow us to expand our comprehensive efforts rescuing edible food and ensuring it is consumed by disadvantaged community members. Would lease payments and costs to retrofit the proposed kitchen space be eligible costs?

    Lease payment of land or building is an ineligible cost. Costs to retrofit the proposed kitchen is eligible cost. Please see Ineligible Costs section on page 5 of the Procedures and Requirements.

  53. Please verify if "expansion of program/process" applies?

    Please refer to Program Background section on page 3 of the Request for Approval.

  54. Under the section, "Feedstock(s) used in the document "Supplemental Business Information", what is the definition of "Organics"?

    In the Supplemental Business Information document under the Feedstock(s) Used section, Organics consists of green and yard waste, however, for purposes of the Food Waste Prevention and Rescue Grant Program, the utilized feedstock should be listed under Food or Food Waste.

  55. For a cooperative grant applicant, are all partners required to have an Environmentally Preferable Purchasing and Practices (EPPP) Policy in place, or just the Lead Applicant?

    For a cooperative grant applicant, the lead applicant is required to have an EPPP Policy in place.

  56. Can the applicant distribute assets purchased through the grant to third parties, where a contractual arrangement can be made to ensure it is used as described in the grant application?

    The applicant must incur all expenses. If partners are involved in the project, the lead applicant must incur the expenses before being reimbursed, and before reimbursing any partners involved. Please see Real and Personal Property Acquired with Grant Funds section on page 10 of the Terms and Conditions.

  57. We are a food bank currently in the process of onboarding a major retailer for our Grocery Rescue Program and have developed a pipeline of other stores and chains to approach. The growth of our Grocery Rescue Program is a key component of our five -year Strategic Plan. What verification should we provide to demonstrate that this new food donor has been secured and that we will continue to increase pounds of food rescued through the addition of new Grocery Rescue food donors during the grant term?

    Please provide all supporting documentation to support the partnerships involved in your Grocery Rescue Program. Supporting documentation may include contracts, letters of support, letters of commitment, etc. Please see Letters of Support section on page 19 of the Application Guidelines and Instructions.

Greenhouse Gas Calculations

  1. How do you determine which California Air Resources Board (ARB) approved Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Calculator to use?

    The Waste Diversion GHG Emission Reduction Calculator Tool is a required application document and is located at ARB’s Cap-and-Trade Auction Proceeds Quantification Materials page. Scroll down to the Natural Resources and Waste Diversion section, find the Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery (CalRecycle) under Agency/Department, and select corresponding link. This calculator is an Excel spreadsheet that contains numerous tabs; select the Food tab for the Food Waste Prevention and Rescue Program. Projects incorporating food rescue should enter tonnage under Edible Food Rescued and food waste prevention activities should enter tonnage under Source Reduction of Food. If projects incorporate both food waste prevention and rescue activities please enter tonnage accordingly. Please refer to the ARB FY 2016-17 Waste Diversion GHG Emission Reduction Calculator Tool section on page 13 of the Application Guidelines and Instructions.

  2. Do we need a new greenhouse gas (GHG) calculator because we are reducing food waste, but we divert it from landfilling after the point of edibility? It is “non-consumable food”.

    Please use the Waste Diversion GHG Emission Reduction Calculator Tool located at ARB’s Cap-and-Trade Auction Proceeds Quantification Materials page. Use the Food tab to enter tonnage for both food waste prevention projects and food rescue projects. Projects incorporating food rescue should enter tonnage under Edible Food Rescued and food waste prevention activities should enter tonnage under Source Reduction of Food. If projects incorporate both food waste prevention and rescue activities please enter tonnage accordingly. Please refer to the ARB FY 2016-17 Waste Diversion GHG Emission Reduction Calculator Tool section on page 13 of the Application Guidelines and Instructions.

  3. Do we need a new greenhouse gas calculator methodology because we neither compost nor landfill our spent digestate? It is fed to livestock.

    Spent digestate is not an eligible feedstock under this grant. Please see Eligible Projects section on page 5 of the Application Guidelines and Instructions.

  4. Alcoholic beverage consumption releases no greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions beyond that of the respiration of the individual who consumes it. The creation of vodka uses anaerobic digestion. Do we need a new GHG calculator methodology because our anaerobic digestion does not result in the production of fuel?

    No. Anaerobic digestion projects are not be eligible for the Food Waste Prevention and Rescue Grant Program. Anaerobic digestion projects are eligible under our Organics Grant Program. Applications for the fiscal year 2016-17 Organics Grant Program were due on March 16, 2017.

  5. Per the 2016-17 Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emission Reduction Factors, does our reduction of food waste (specifically all manner of bakery goods) use the same reduction factor as what are labeled as “grains” on the “FOOD” tab of the Waste Diversion GHG Emission Reduction Calculator Tool?

    Yes.

  6. On the Waste Diversion Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emission Reduction Calculator Tool Spreadsheet the food tab says “Waste Diversion Grant and Loan Program”. Is there another one that is specific to the Food Waste Prevention and Rescue Grant Program or is this the correct one?

    The spreadsheet titled “Waste Diversion GHG Emissions Reduction Calculator for FY 2015-16 and FY 2016-17” is the correct spreadsheet. Please use the Food tab in this spreadsheet to complete enter tonnage data.

  7. In the Organics Grant Program from January 2017, CalRecycle allowed for an Alternative Greenhouse Gas Methodology Request Period if a project could not be calculated using the standard quantification methodology provided. Will CalRecycle consider a similar Alternative Greenhouse Gas Methodology for this solicitation?

    No. Alternative Methodologies cannot be submitted for the Food Waste Prevention and Rescue Grant Program.

  8. In the Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Reduction Calculator under the Food tab, what exactly is meant by Edible Food Rescued and Source Reduction of Food Waste? I see the definition in a previous tab but I am still not clear how I come up with that number. We know how much food is ordered now and how much of that is thrown away by the students. Do we compare that to other places where our program has been in place and compare the disposed food?

    Edible Food Rescued is food that otherwise would be disposed but is recovered for human consumption. Source Reduction of food waste is elimination of food waste before it is created. Each of these activities will result in less disposed food waste and it is up to you on how you quantify how much food can be rescued or source reduced. The GHG calculator will automatically calculate the GHGs from the tons of material you will source reduce or rescue. Note that the rescue calculation may prompt the need for a specified refrigerant if you are purchasing a refrigeration system.

  9. What is an acceptable way to measure newly diverted food waste prevented or food rescued from landfill?

    We do not have one set way to measure prevented or rescued food waste. However, an example could be measuring the reduction of food waste disposed by weighing the amount of food disposed and comparing that to previous months. The amount of food rescued could be quantified by weighing the amount of additional food recovered from food generators compared to previous monthly recovery amounts.

Last updated: August 28, 2017
Climate Change: http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/Climate/
Contact: climatechange@calrecycle.ca.gov