California Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery (CalRecycle)

State Agency Reporting Center: Waste Management Annual Report

2014 SARC Annual Report: Humboldt State University

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Alternative Name(s): HSU, California State University, Humboldt
 
Physical Address
1 Harpst St
Arcata, CA 95521
Humboldt County
Jurisdiction: Arcata
CalRecycle Representative
Spencer Fine
mpk9@humboldt.edu
(916) 341-6465
 
Number of Employees at Main Agency: 2,164
Total Number of Employees including Facilities: 2,187
Recycling Coordinator: Morgan King   mpk9@humboldt.edu   (707) 826-5889

Facilities
Facility NameNumber of EmployeesAddress
Telonicher Marine Laboratory 15 570 Ewing Street
Trinidad, CA   95570
HSU Natural History Museum 2 1315 G Street
Arcata, CA   95521
First Street Art Gallery 1 422 First Street
Eureka, CA   95501
Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center 3 921 Waterfront Drive
Eureka, CA   95501
10th Street Preschool and Toddler Center 2 1663 10th St
Arcata, CA   95521
Total Employees in Facilities:23 
Export To ExcelCount: 5   

Annual Per Capita Disposal

Employees

Total Number of Employees: 2,187

Explain who was included in this number and how this employee number was calculated:
Total number of employees includes State employees (1,379) as well as employees of auxiliary organizations (193) and grant-funded employees (682) functioning on campus. 2014 Employee counts were provided by HSU Human Resources, the University Center Business Office, and the HSU Sponsored Programs Foundation. These numbers represent individuals that are not students but are being paid for any amount of hours, by the State or auxiliary organizations or through grants.

Non-Employee Population

Total Number of Non-employees: 8,854

Non-employee Population Type: Students

Explain who was included in this number and explain how this non-employee number was calculated:
The student population comprises approximately 80% of the total campus population. The HSU Department of Institutional Research and Planning provided the total number of students enrolled for at least one unit of credit in 2014.

Disposal


Total amount Disposed: 626.00 tons

Total amount of Transformation: 0.00 tons

Explain how the disposal number was calculated. Explain how the transformation number was determined (if applicable):
Disposal tonnage is based on actual weights (as reported on weight tags and receipts) from campus haulers (i.e., self-haul) and waste or construction contractors. All construction contractor and contracted waste hauler weights are tallied and added to direct haul quantities to identify the annual disposal total. The 2014 disposal total is significantly higher than the 2013 total. In 2013, the University was participating in a food-waste diversion program and was thus able to remove the majority of pre- and post-consumer food waste from its MSW stream. The food-waste diversion program was suspended at the start of 2014, so the majority of food-waste and food-soiled paper generated on campus that year was disposed of as trash.


Annual Results

          Employee Population   Student Population
    Target Annual     Target Annual
  Per Capita Disposal Rate (pounds/person/day): 10.70 1.57     1.90 0.39




Questions


What types of waste are still thrown away (not reused, recycled, or composted)?
The University's solid waste stream is comprised of MSW (generated by students, faculty, staff and campus visitors) and construction & demolition (C&D) related material. The MSW stream is primarily comprised of food waste, compost-able and bio-plastic disposable containers, paper towels, plastic and foam packaging, and composite materials. Approximately 1/4 of the student population lives on campus and utilizes the campus waste system for their domestic MSW. We also continue to find a limited amount of recyclable materials in the MSW, but through education and deployment of additional recycling bins across campus we address this issue. Similar to the last several years, the campus has continued to have major construction projects contribute to the overall waste stream. In fact, construction related debris comprised approximately 5% (by weight of the total waste stream) for 2014. C&D debris included contaminated lumber/plywood coated with materials making it unsuitable for recycling, shipping materials not locally recycled (e.g., shrink wrap and packing materials), and composite materials unsuitable for re-use and not locally recyclable, such as old mattresses, masonry, sheet rock, and asphalt shingles. Efforts to reduce construction waste are ongoing. This includes maintaining (and expanding when possible) a list of locally recyclable materials and their outlets, tightening contract language to mandate maximum recycling by contractors, and educating facilities maintenance staff and contractors on recycling options and responsibilities.

What difficulties or obstacles have you had with finding ways to reuse, recycle, or compost these types of waste materials?
The University is located in a rural county (a population approximating 135,000 in 2014), and as such the county is afforded fewer recycling options and services compared to more metropolitan areas. We continue to be locally challenged to recycle certain materials (e.g., bed mattresses), and it is cost-prohibitive to transport certain materials out of county for recycling. Improving the campus community's participation in recycling and composting is ongoing. The majority of the student population comes from parts of California where the recycling system is different than how it is practiced at HSU. Students receive targeted education in how and where to compost and recycle when they first come to campus. Even with education and outreach, however, we must battle apathy on the part of some students and staff, which can be especially challenging because there is no obvious cost or social incentive for them to reduce waste. The Sustainability Office therefore continues to work with HSU Housing & Dining Services, the Waste Reduction & Resource Awareness Program and other student groups to implement education and outreach campaigns throughout the year, designed to increase participation in composting and recycling efforts.


Programs
Recycling
 
  • Beverage containers
  •  
  • Glass
  •  
  • Plastics (#3-7)
  •  
  • Carpet
  •  
  • Cardboard
  •  
  • Newspaper
  •  
  • Office paper (white)
  •  
  • Office paper (mixed)
  •  
  • Confidential shredded paper
  •  
  • Copier/toner cartridges
  •  
  • Scrap metal
  •  
  • Wood waste
  •  
  • Textiles
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  • Tires
  •  
  • White goods
  •  
  • Construction materials/debris
  •  
  • Rendering
  • In 2014 the University continued with a single stream recycling program - on campus all recycling receptacles can accept mixed fibers as well as bottles, cans and plastic containers. In November 2014 the University's MSW started going to a dirty MRF, where recoverable recycling is separated out, weighed and then reported back to the campus. Campus recycling receptacles include 2 yard dumpsters behind buildings, 60 gallon outdoor receptacles outside of buildings, in parking lots and along pathways, and 8 to 23 gallon bins inside buildings, offices, hallways, etc. The Office of Sustainability provides additional totes, to faculty and staff cleaning out their offices, for the collection of mixed paper, books, and re-usable office supplies. Additional recycling bins are also put out at major events, e.g. football games, concerts, and BBQ's. Student workers in the Waste Reduction & Resource Awareness Program (WRRAP) attend to the bins and educate participants in proper recycling.

     

    Organics Recycling
     
  • Xeriscaping (climate appropriate landscaping)
  •  
  • Grasscycling
  •  
  • Green Waste - On-site composting and mulching
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  • Green Waste - Self-haul
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  • Food scraps - On-site composting and mulching
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  • Food scraps - Self-haul
  • Green Waste: In 2014 the Facilities Grounds department self hauled 198 tons of green waste to a commercial composting facility. The Housing Grounds department operated an on-site composting operation, and composted approximately 2.4 tons of non-weedy, non-food organics Food Scraps: Up until December 2013 the University was participating in a pilot food waste diversion program (coordinated by the Humboldt Waste Management Authority, or HWMA), sending approximately 140 tons of pre- and post-consumer food waste and food soiled paper to a commercial composting facility. That month, however, HWMA abruptly notified the University that it was indefinitely suspending the program. The University expects to have an alternative program up and running by the third quarter of 2015. Some food waste composting continued in 2014, however. WRRAP continues to operate a 3 cubic yard in-vessel composter (the Earth Tub) on campus, from which approximately 12,000 pounds of compost is processed each year. In December 0.75 tons of pre-consumer food scraps went to a nearby hog farm. In 2015 the University will increase the amount of food scraps it sends to the the hog farm.

     

    Material Exchange
     
  • Nonprofit/school donations
  •  
  • Internal property reutilizations
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  • State surplus (accepted by DGS)
  •  
  • Used book exchange/buy backs
  •  
  • Employee supplies exchange
  • In 2014 the University provided over 54 tons of surplus as donations to schools, other state agencies or non-profits, approximately 12 tons of which was collected from campus residents during Donation Dash, an event held in May to capture re-usable materials when students are moving out of the residence halls. The university maintains a warehouse to store surplus items and coordinates with public agencies and non-profits for material re-distribution. The Reusable Office Supply & Exchange (ROSE) is a student-run depot on campus that accepts and re-distributes used office, classroom and art supplies to the campus community. In 2014 ROSE re-distributed approximately 1.5 tons of supplies. The HSU Bookstore hosts a book rental and book buy back program. WRRAP holds book and music exchange events each semester in the HSU library.

     

    Waste Prevention/Re-use
     
  • Paper forms reduction - online forms
  •  
  • Bulletin boards
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  • Retreaded/Recapped tires
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  • Washable/Reusable cups, service ware, towels
  •  
  • Reusable boxes
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  • Reusable pallets
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  • Electronic document storage
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  • Intranet
  •  
  • Reuse of office furniture, equipment & supplies
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  • Reuse of packing materials
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  • Reuse of construction/remodeling materials
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  • Double-sided copies
  •  
  • Email vs. paper memos
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  • Food Donation
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  • Electric air hand-dryers
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  • Remanufactured equipment
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  • Rags made from waste cloth or reusable rags
  • Administrative Affairs instituted default double-sided printing on copiers. The University provides departments with secure networks for electronic document storage. Most applications and agreements are now electronic in format. The campus also uses electronic bulletin boards for general announcements. HSU Dining incentivizes the use of re-usable cups for drink refills and provides free coffee mugs to incoming residents at the beginning of the acadmic year.

     

    Green Procurement
     
  • Recycled Content Product (RCP) procurement policy
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  • Environmentally Preferable Purchasing (EPP) procurement policy
  •  
  • RCP/EPP and/or SABRC requirements language included in procurement contracts for products/materials
  •  
  • Other green procurement activities (explain in Agency Program Notes below)
  • The University has a purchasing policy in place for 100% post-consumer recycled content paper. The University also uses Green Seal cleaning products and EPEAT consumer electronics.

     

    Training and Education
     
  • Signage (signs, posters, including labels for recycling bins. Existing or planned for 2017.)*
  •  
  • Employee training (Existing or planned for 2017)*
  •  
  • Web page (intranet or internet)
  •  
  • Brochures, flyers, newsletters, publications, newspaper articles/ads
  •  
  • Office recycling guide, fact sheets
  •  
  • New employee package
  •  
  • Outreach (internal/external) e.g. environmental fairs
  •  
  • Seminars, workshops, special speakers
  •  
  • Employee incentives, competitions/prizes
  •  
  • Press releases
  •  
  • Waste audits, waste evaluations/surveys
  •  
  • Special recycling/reuse events
  • The Office of Sustainability (OS), HSU Residence Life and student groups conduct social marketing campaigns and events to increase participation in the recycling and waste reduction efforts on campus. The OS also trains Dining and Facilities Management staff on waste reduction and recycling responsibilities. Student groups partner with the OS to conduct special events (e.g., RecycleMania, Game Day Challenge, Green Graduation and other zero waste events) to highlight waste diversion and increase engagement. The OS hosts a website providing the campus community with information on recycling and waste diversion. Residence Life hosts the Virtual Green Room (a virtual green dorm demonstration room) and the Green Room Certification (a self assessment tool to engage residents in green lifestyle choices and behaviors).

     

    State Agency Waste Management Programs, http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/StateAgency/
    Recycling Coordinator: SARC@calrecycle.ca.gov, (916) 341-6199
    Buy Recycled Campaign: BuyRecycled@calrecycle.ca.gov, (916) 341-6199