Listed below are recent posts across all of CalRecyle's blogs.

  • Putting Cap-and-Trade Dollars to Work for California

    CalRecycle’s greenhouse gas reduction grant and loan programs put Cap-and-Trade dollars to work for California by reducing greenhouse gas emissions, strengthening our economy, and improving public health and the environment—particularly in low-income and disadvantaged communities.

    Since 2014, CalRecycle has received $105 million from Cap-and-Trade funding. So far, funds have been funneled into three grant categories:

    • Food Waste Prevention and Rescue Grant Program—$9.38 million
    • Organics Grant Program—$72 million
    • Recycled Fiber, Plastic, and Glass Grant Program—$14 million

    You can read more about specific grant recipients and their efforts to help expand California’s recycling infrastructure in the “Putting Cap-and-Trade Dollars to Work for California” booklet.

    CalRecycle receives Cap-and-Trade funds to help California meet two statewide objectives: 

    • Reduce the amount of solid waste going to landfills by 75 percent by 2020 (AB 341)
    • Reduce the amount of organic material going to landfills by 75 percent by 2025 and recover at least 20 percent of disposed edible food by 2025 (SB 1383)

    California will need to move about 20 million tons a year out of the disposal stream to meet these goals. Regarding 75 percent organics recycling – a statewide mandate – CalRecycle estimates that roughly 50 to 100 new and expanded organics recycling facilities, at a cost of approximately $2 billion to $3 billion in capital investment, are needed to handle this amount of material.

    CalRecycle-funded organics recycling and digestion projects expand existing capacity or establish new facilities to reduce the amount of California-generated green materials and/or alternative daily cover sent to landfills. Landfilling of organics generates methane, a GHG about 80 times more potent than carbon dioxide over a 20 year horizon.

    Food Waste Prevention and Rescue projects (often run by food banks and food pantries) keep edible food out of landfills by reducing the amount of food waste that is generated or rescuing edible food from the waste stream.

    Recycled Fiber, Plastic, and Glass projects build or expand infrastructure for manufacturing products with recycled fiber (paper, textiles, carpet, or wood), plastic, or glass.

    Together, these programs are expanding the necessary infrastructure for California to manage our waste responsibly. As an added bonus, they also happen to be among the most cost-effective GHG grant programs in the state!

    Posted on In the Loop by Christina Files on Oct 8, 2018

  • CalRecycle Prepares New Round of Food Waste Prevention/Rescue Climate Investments

    The California Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery is set to move forward with eligibility and scoring criteria changes to enhance the department’s Food Waste Prevention and Rescue Grant Program. Proposed changes would expand the potential pool of applicants and stress the importance of job creation, training, and public outreach and education within California’s disadvantaged communities.

    The requested adjustments to eligibility, scoring criteria, and evaluation for the Food Waste Prevention and Rescue Grant Program come ahead of a new FY 2018-19 grant cycle in which $5.7 million has been allocated to the California Climate Investments program. Earlier this year, CalRecycle announced the first award recipients for its new Food Waste Prevention and Rescue Grant Program. As part of California’s comprehensive strategy to combat climate change, CalRecycle awarded $9.4 million to 31 projects throughout the state that:

    • Decrease the estimated 6 million tons of food waste landfilled in California each year, and
    • Increase the state’s capacity to collect, transport, store, and distribute more food for the roughly 1 in 8 Californians who are food-insecure.

    When sent to landfills, food and other organic waste decomposes and generates methane, a potent greenhouse gas with a heat-trapping effect at least 86 times greater than carbon dioxide over a 20-year span.

    CalRecycle’s upcoming public meeting will also feature new information about payment rates in California’s Beverage Container Recycling Program and important updates about the state’s mattress and paint stewardship programs.

    CalRecycle September 2018 Public Meeting
    10 a.m. Tuesday, September 18
    Coastal Hearing Room, CalEPA Building
    1001 I St., Sacramento, CA

    You can find the full agenda for CalRecycle’s September public meeting here. If you can’t make it in person, join us by webcast (the link will go live shortly before the meeting begins).

    Posted on In the Loop on Sep 14, 2018

  • Climate Pollutants Fall Below 1990 Levels for First Time

    “In a major win for California’s fight against global warming, the state appears to have hit its first target for cutting greenhouse gases — and it reached the goal four years early.“

    Here’s the full news release from the California Air Resources Board. Congratulations, California!

    Posted on In the Loop on Jul 12, 2018