Listed below are recent posts across all of CalRecyle's blogs.

  • California Resource Recovery Association: A Culture of Zero Waste

    CalRecycle staff speaking at podiums, speaking to conference members, and an outdoor group photo.

    Since 1974, the nonprofit organization California Resource Recovery Association has been working toward a more sustainable California through promoting product stewardship, waste prevention, and recycling. The group’s annual conference for which we are a sponsor, brings together cities, counties, councilmembers, businesses, nonprofit organizations, and industry professionals to network and discuss environmental issues. Every year, CalRecycle staff and guest speakers offer a cornucopia of information about policies, practices, and studies at comprehensive educational and plenary sessions.

    At this year’s conference, we participated in four panels on topics ranging from e-waste and grants to statewide recycling to educate attendees about upcoming regulations, funding programs, and waste management practices. We even got to meet Ryan Hickman, the 10-year-old mini-mogul who has taken the recycling world by storm by starting his own business at the age of 3! Other speakers included Timothy Bouldry of the International Solid Waste Association, which runs a scholarship program for children living in dumpsites across the world; and Froilan Grate, who is the executive director of GAIA Philippines, which educates and promotes community-based waste management and construction of material recovery facilities.

    Posted on In the Loop by - TC Clark on Aug 22, 2019

  • Does CalRecycle Own Any Recycling or Waste Businesses?

    A Brief Overview of Waste Collection and Recycling in California

    When it comes to waste and recycling, California has a jurisdiction/state system similar to our nation’s state/federal system. This system allows local communities to customize their waste management programs while complying with state laws. CalRecycle does not own or operate any waste management or recycling facilities or hauler services in the state. As a result, there is no standardized universal waste management system throughout the state. Instead, the department provides oversight to local governments and businesses to ensure they comply with state laws and work to meet statewide recycling goals and mandates.

    Most jurisdictions contract with private waste hauler businesses to collect waste from residents and businesses. A hauler provides residents and businesses with collection containers (often called bins or dumpsters) and collection service. These contract agreements are strictly between the jurisdiction and the hauler, and are not subject to CalRecycle oversight.  

    CalRecycle, in partnership with local enforcement agencies (LEA), regulates the operation of solid waste handling, processing, and disposal activities to protect the public health and safety and the environment as well as ensure a level playing field for solid waste businesses. CalRecycle certifies LEAs to ensure the facilities/operations within their jurisdiction operate according to state minimum standards and permit conditions. Although each LEA is responsible for its jurisdiction, CalRecycle provides training, guidance and oversight to ensure LEAs consistently and equitably enforce state laws to ensure facilities are operating effectively.

    CalRecycle activities include certifying and evaluating local enforcement agency programs; reviewing/concurring on permit and closure/post closure documents; inspecting all facilities before permits are issued; and inspecting active and closed landfills and other facilities in coordination with the LEA.

    Although California does not own any haulers, waste facilities, or recycling centers, CalRecycle does manage and mitigate the impacts of solid waste by ensuring local compliance with regulations and state minimum standards through integrated and consistent permitting, inspection, and enforcement efforts.

    To learn more about local opportunities to recycle, check out our Recycle webpage.

    Posted on In the Loop by Christina Files on Apr 11, 2019

  • Planet Protecting-Prom: Dance the Night Away Eco-Guilt-Free

    Sandy and Danny dancing in the movie Grease

    Corsages and cummerbunds mark prom season just before the end of the school year. Soon students will be shopping for dresses, tuxes, and limos, but at what cost to the environment? If you’re a freshman to the world of sustainability, take note of these tips for a planet-protecting prom.

    Various prom dresses

    Give Fast Fashion the Slip

    It can be difficult to avoid those inexpensive clothing items when you or your teenager are fashion-forward on a budget. But, armed with the knowledge that the fashion industry (especially fast fashion) is one of the main contributors to landfill waste, pollution, and unfair labor practices, it might be a little easier to give up those bargain garments. Instead, try purchasing something secondhand. Just because it was previously owned, that does not mean it is cheap, tacky, or unsophisticated. In fact, most prom dresses are only worn once, so it’s likely any “used” dress will be in excellent condition—not to mention less expensive. You can also get creative and refashion a secondhand item that has potential. Don’t have enough room in your closet or not as creative as you’d like to be? Find a dress rental company in your area—tuxes are rented, so why can’t a dress be? Another option can be a formal clothing exchange between friends, an exchange program, or even your library—yes, your library! There are also plenty of places to donate your dress when you’re done with it.

    Olive Oyl applying makeup

    Makeover Your Cosmetic Bag

    Looking your best doesn’t stop at your outfit, and it shouldn’t come at the expense of the planet. Whether you or your teen wears makeup or simple moisturizer, applies lots of hair product or just needs a razor to get rid of unwanted stubble, there is an earth-friendly option for everyone. Start by asking what cosmetics and beauty accessories are made of—plastic or natural ingredients? Biodegradable or single-use? What about excess packaging? Look for zero-waste companies, or DIY your cosmetics.

    Limo driving to dance

    Limopool

    If you or your teen can afford to rent a limo, make sure to get as many passengers as possible. This will help offset the carbon emissions created by driving multiple cars, and it can also help bring down the cost of the rental. If a limo isn’t in the cards, try regular carpooling or even a pedicab if the venue is nearby. No one expects anyone to ride their bike in their formals, but a pedicab or even a horse-drawn carriage can be a fun and eco-friendly option if the dance is nearby.

    Peter Parker handing a corsage to his date

    Corsage Compost

    After the night is over, the formal footwear is kicked off and it’s time to hit the hay, don’t toss your boutoniere or corsage in the trash. If you don’t plan on hanging on to your flowers as a keepsake, compost it or throw it in your yard waste bin minus the ribbons, pins, and other decorations—you can always reuse those, but they don’t belong in the pile with other organic waste.

    Now get out there and promenade that planet-protecting way, knowing you did the right thing for future prom-goers!

    Posted on In the Loop by TC Clark on Apr 8, 2019