Listed below are recent posts across all of CalRecyle's blogs.

  • CalRecycle Launches New Recycling and Disposal Reporting System

    CalRecycle Launches New Recycling and Disposal Reporting System


    As a state with more than 40 million residents, California generates a lot of waste—to the tune of 77.2 million tons in 2017 alone. In 2019, CalRecycle launched a new Recycling and Disposal Reporting System to track how organics, recyclable material, and solid waste are managed throughout the state. Regulated businesses have registered and, in some cases, have already started reporting data to CalRecycle. The department expects to release the first quarterly report in January 2020.

    Under the previous reporting system, information was reported to counties and regional agencies that aggregated the data before sending it to CalRecycle. To better understand the composition of our waste streams, CalRecycle supplemented that data with detailed waste characterization studies.

    The new system builds on these efforts by requiring recycling and composting businesses, facilities, and operations to report directly to CalRecycle, thereby streamlining the submittal process and helping CalRecycle not only understand what is being recycled, but also where in the state materials are managed. With better data, CalRecycle can more accurately assess the waste and recycling industry landscape in order to identify specific challenges and promulgate potential solutions.  

    Regulated businesses are starting to report their data in incremental steps as materials flow through collection centers and transfer stations to recyclers, composters, and landfills. Quarter Three (July-September) 2019 data will be fully reported by the end of December 2019, and CalRecycle will analyze and report the results in January 2020.

    Posted on In the Loop by Christina Files on Oct 24, 2019

  • California Resource Recovery Association: A Culture of Zero Waste

    CalRecycle staff speaking at podiums, speaking to conference members, and an outdoor group photo.

    Since 1974, the nonprofit organization California Resource Recovery Association has been working toward a more sustainable California through promoting product stewardship, waste prevention, and recycling. The group’s annual conference for which we are a sponsor, brings together cities, counties, councilmembers, businesses, nonprofit organizations, and industry professionals to network and discuss environmental issues. Every year, CalRecycle staff and guest speakers offer a cornucopia of information about policies, practices, and studies at comprehensive educational and plenary sessions.

    At this year’s conference, we participated in four panels on topics ranging from e-waste and grants to statewide recycling to educate attendees about upcoming regulations, funding programs, and waste management practices. We even got to meet Ryan Hickman, the 10-year-old mini-mogul who has taken the recycling world by storm by starting his own business at the age of 3! Other speakers included Timothy Bouldry of the International Solid Waste Association, which runs a scholarship program for children living in dumpsites across the world; and Froilan Grate, who is the executive director of GAIA Philippines, which educates and promotes community-based waste management and construction of material recovery facilities.

    Posted on In the Loop by - TC Clark on Aug 22, 2019

  • Does CalRecycle Own Any Recycling or Waste Businesses?

    A Brief Overview of Waste Collection and Recycling in California

    When it comes to waste and recycling, California has a jurisdiction/state system similar to our nation’s state/federal system. This system allows local communities to customize their waste management programs while complying with state laws. CalRecycle does not own or operate any waste management or recycling facilities or hauler services in the state. As a result, there is no standardized universal waste management system throughout the state. Instead, the department provides oversight to local governments and businesses to ensure they comply with state laws and work to meet statewide recycling goals and mandates.

    Most jurisdictions contract with private waste hauler businesses to collect waste from residents and businesses. A hauler provides residents and businesses with collection containers (often called bins or dumpsters) and collection service. These contract agreements are strictly between the jurisdiction and the hauler, and are not subject to CalRecycle oversight.  

    CalRecycle, in partnership with local enforcement agencies (LEA), regulates the operation of solid waste handling, processing, and disposal activities to protect the public health and safety and the environment as well as ensure a level playing field for solid waste businesses. CalRecycle certifies LEAs to ensure the facilities/operations within their jurisdiction operate according to state minimum standards and permit conditions. Although each LEA is responsible for its jurisdiction, CalRecycle provides training, guidance and oversight to ensure LEAs consistently and equitably enforce state laws to ensure facilities are operating effectively.

    CalRecycle activities include certifying and evaluating local enforcement agency programs; reviewing/concurring on permit and closure/post closure documents; inspecting all facilities before permits are issued; and inspecting active and closed landfills and other facilities in coordination with the LEA.

    Although California does not own any haulers, waste facilities, or recycling centers, CalRecycle does manage and mitigate the impacts of solid waste by ensuring local compliance with regulations and state minimum standards through integrated and consistent permitting, inspection, and enforcement efforts.

    To learn more about local opportunities to recycle, check out our Recycle webpage.

    Posted on In the Loop by Christina Files on Apr 11, 2019