Listed below are recent posts across all of CalRecyle's blogs.

  • Our Audience Asks: What Is the 50/50/50 Rule?

    Our Audience Asks: What is the 50/50/50 Rule?

    Last week, I received a phone call from a fellow Californian and avid recycler asking about the 50/50/50 rule at recycling centers. For those of you who don’t know what that is, I’ll get to it shortly. After the call, I started wondering what people actually know about the Beverage Container Recycling Program regulations, California law, and rules made by recycling centers for operational efficiency. So, let’s clear up some confusion.

    California Refund Value (CRV)

    Most people know what this is, but just in case, here’s a refresher! CRV is the amount a customer pays when they purchase beverages in eligible containers like aluminum, plastic, and glass. You should see this amount on your store receipt. This amount is paid back to customers once they return the eligible containers to a certified recycling center or dealer (the place where you bought the container). The amount for each container is 5 cents for anything under 24 ounces and 10 cents for anything 24 ounces or greater.

    Certified Recycling Centers 

    Recycling centers are privately owned businesses that are certified by us, CalRecycle. And just like any other company, they’re in the business of making money, so you may have noticed some closing in recent years because it’s hard to turn a profit when global markets take a downward turn. These privately owned businesses are allowed to make certain rules about collecting recyclables for business operation efficiency, but they must follow certain regulations set by CalRecycle, and CalRecycle must follow the laws set by the State of California. That also means if you have a complaint or concern about a specific recycling center or dealer, you can call us at 1-800-Recycle to file a formal complaint. Our hotline staff really appreciate when you’re polite to them! I know because I sit right next to them and hear what they have to go through--it’s not always pretty. After your complaint is filed, our department will follow up with that center to resolve the issue. 

    50/50/50 Rule

    Recycling centers are allowed to pay by weight as a matter of business efficiency, but if you request to have the recycling center count each container so you can redeem the exact amount you paid, California law allows you that option. The recycling center is required to comply with that rule. But, in order to keep business moving, you can only redeem 50 of each container type per visit. What does that mean? You can bring up to 50 aluminum, 50 glass, and 50 plastic beverage containers for a total of 150 CRV eligible containers. And just to ensure the recycling center attendant and people in line behind you don’t roll their eyes at you, sort your containers ahead of time and let them know beforehand that you want to receive payment by count. 

    For more information about Beverage Container Recycling visit our FAQ page

    Posted on In the Loop by TC Clark on Aug 1, 2019

  • CalRecycle Gardening Tips, Word for Word

    The weather is warming and you’re finding yourself out in your yard a lot more these days. If you’re looking for ways to make your garden a little more sustainable and eco-friendly, here are some concepts to consider

    Words to Live (Sustainably) By: Gardening Edition
    Posted on In the Loop by TC Clark on Jun 10, 2019

  • CalRecycle Newbie Maneuvers the Learning Curve

    Syd Fong

     

    Seriously, who knew? I’ve been saying that a lot since I arrived at CalRecycle as its new Public Information Officer. I remember thinking I had some type of understanding about this department—it’s all about recycling, right? Nope, not even close.

    Here are some CalRecycle links that I think that are helpful not only for someone in my position but really for any Californian who may be concerned about our environment. 

    SB1383: This law establishes methane emissions reduction targets in a statewide effort to reduce emissions of short-lived climate pollutants (SLCP) in various sectors of California's economy. This would require a 50 percent reduction in statewide disposal of organic waste from the 2014 level by 2020 and a 75 percent reduction by 2025.  So reducing food waste and composting will be huge for all Californians to understand.

    Where to recycle: I know my relatives have been asking me this a lot since I got the job (like somehow I’m an overnight expert or something), so this link was great to share so I can seem somewhat competent when I talk to my family. 

    Glossary of waste prevention terms: What’s sustainability or worm composting?  This page will help to figure what those terms mean—and possibly prepare you to be a contestant on Jeopardy. (Alex, I’ll take Xeriscaping for $400, please.)

    Wildfire debris cleanup: CalRecycle has been managing the debris cleanup for the Camp Fire, Woolsey Fire, and Hill Fire.  It’s just another aspect of this department that I find fascinating.   

    As you can tell, there’s so much to learn here, but I’m excited to be a part of this team and soak up as much information as I can in the very near future.  Wish me luck. 

    Posted on In the Loop by Syd Fong on May 9, 2019