Listed below are recent posts across all of CalRecyle's blogs.

  • Five CalRecycle Webpages You Should Know About

    CalRecycle’s website has more than 3,000 webpages to educate consumers, government entities, and business owners about responsible waste management and recycling. Chances are you come to our website looking for something specific, like where to recycle certain items or information about a newly implemented recycling law. Here is a list of other useful CalRecycle webpages.

    Recycling Starter Kits

    Did you know CalRecycle will send you a free starter kit? Whether you’re a schoolteacher or a private business owner, we will send you a complimentary black bin to collect California Refund Value (CRV) beverage containers.

    Green Building

    CalRecycle features an entire section of webpages dedicated to educating visitors about green building principles. Browse through case studies that describe how businesses have incorporated these into their building management plans. You can search the case studies by category, making it easy for homeowners, retail business owners, school facility managers, and large venue managers to find helpful information about sustainable buildings.

    Wastes Banned from the Trash

    Certain things just shouldn’t be tossed out carelessly. In fact, it is illegal to dispose of household hazardous waste in the garbage, down storm drains, or onto the ground? Chemicals in hazardous waste can be released into the environment and contaminate our air and water, and possibly the food we eat. Learn how to manage light bulbs, batteries, electronic devices, paint, and used oil in a responsible way.

    Backyard Composting DIY

    The best way to recycle your food waste is to compost it. If you have a curbside organics collection service that allows food waste, you can toss in those onion peels and apple cores. If not, you can start your own backyard composting bin. Compost adds nutrients to soil that benefit plants, and it increases soil’s water retention capacity, which is especially helpful during drought seasons. This webpage includes a recipe for compost, troubleshooting tips, and a guide to building your own composting bin.

    Waste Reduction

    Recycling is great, but preventing waste from being generated is even better. Scroll to the bottom of the page to learn how to reduce waste at home, at work, at school, and at special events. You can even find case studies that feature efforts to reduce and divert waste at events and sites throughout the state.

    Posted on In the Loop by Christina Files on Nov 1, 2018

  • Trick or Treat?

    Eco-Friendly Options for Halloween

    All those decorations and costumes can be terrifyingly tempting to purchase this Halloween. Plus, those single-use spider webs, silly straws, and synthetic fabric costumes are so convenient. But, all those festive items don’t end up resting in peace in a landfill—they live disturbingly in dreadful dumps for many years, sometimes an eternity. Here’s how you can make a smart choice between a tricky item and a treat.

    spider webs

    Dead-corations

    Single-use spider webs are realistic, but they’re also made from petrifying polyester and are meant to only be used one time. Sure, you can try using them again, but you end up with clumps of sticky strands. Try using yarn to make reusable spider webs for your horrifying haunted house.

    Playing Dress-Up

    Dressing up is arguably the best part of Halloween, and opting for reusable and higher-quality costumes and accessories can ensure you have a good time every year. Instead of purchasing fast-fashion costumes that won’t last, consider making costumes from things you already have around your house. 

    S-carry On

    Sure, the plastic pumpkin has been a Halloween staple for trick-or-treaters to carry their ghoulish goodies, but how about going old-school and using a pillowcase instead? Add some decorations for a frightfully festive look.

    Light the Night

    Glow sticks are creepily cool and are a safer alternative to candles in your jack-o’-lanterns, but like other Halloween decorations, they’re made to only be used one time. Use small, battery-powered “candles” instead or flashlights when lighting up the night. (Don’t forget to use rechargeable batteries!)

    Ghost Host

    If you’re hosting a party this year, invite people through text or social media, or in person. Skip the paper invitations, especially those made with items that are not easily recyclable like gruesome glitter, petrifying plastic, or frightening foil.

    dinnerware

    Eat, Drink, and Be Scary

    Ditch those disposables! Leave the paper plates, plastic utensils, plastic cups, and straws at the store and use your everyday plates, cups, and utensils. Go the extra step with cloth napkins.

    Well, bats all folks. Until next HalloGREEN!

    Posted on In the Loop by TC Clark on Oct 22, 2018

  • CalRecycle Considers New Carpet Recycling Stewardship Plan

    With nearly 40 million people living in 13 million households, California goes through a lot of carpet. More than 90 million square yards are sold in the state each year. According to CalRecycle’s most recent statewide waste characterization study, discarded carpet accounts for nearly 2 percent of the waste disposed in California, or roughly 570,000 tons of disposed material each year.

    In 2010, California established the first mandatory carpet stewardship program in the country to make carpet manufacturers responsible for the end-of-life management of their product. At its October 2018 public meeting, CalRecycle will exercise its responsibility under AB 2398 (Perez, Chapter 681, Statutes of 2010) and consider whether the industry stewardship organization Carpet America Recovery Effort is taking sufficient actions in its proposed California Carpet Stewardship Plan for 2018-2022 to meet California’s 24 percent carpet recycling goal.

    In addition to consideration of the carpet stewardship plan, CalRecycle staff are expected to:

    • Announce new Recycling Market Development Zone and California Climate Investment loans to boost recycling infrastructure in California
    • Provide updates on CalRecycle’s new electronic reporting system for disposal and recycling facilities
    • Share new data from California’s Beverage Container Recycling Program, including updated recycling rates for CRV bottles and cans

    CalRecycle October 2018 Public Meeting
    10 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 16
    Byron Sher Auditorium, CalEPA Building
    1001 I St., Sacramento, CA

    You can find the full agenda for CalRecycle’s October public meeting here. If you can’t make it in person, join us by webcast (the link will go live shortly before the meeting begins).

    Posted on In the Loop by CalRecycle Staff on Oct 15, 2018