Listed below are recent posts across all of CalRecyle's blogs.

  • CalRecycle Cleanup Grants Announced

    Resighini Rancheria to Receive Nearly $50,000 for Floodplain Cleanup

    The California Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery has awarded the Resighini Rancheria a $49,237 Farm and Ranch Solid Waste Cleanup and Abatement grant to clear an illegal dumpsite in the Klamath River estuary. The remote property on a Klamath River floodplain is currently home to illegally dumped vehicles, trailers, boats, appliances, propane tanks, tires, and other debris. In addition to the effects on wildlife, the stripped vehicles and appliances have increased contamination concerns on the property, which is zoned for agricultural use.

    The Resighini Rancheria will use grant funds to remediate the property and take steps to prevent illegal dumping in the future.

    These items were part of the clutter at an illegal dumpsite on the Klamath River estuary within the Resighini Rancheria.

    CalRecycle also awarded the Mariposa County Resource Conservation District a $5,630 Farm and Ranch Cleanup grant to clear tires, wire, metal, wood waste, furniture, and other household trash illegally dumped near the Mariposa County community of Jerseydale. U.S. Forest Service workers came across the half-acre site within the Sierra National Forest and requested cleanup assistance from the district. The land is typically used for a variety of recreational and agriculture uses including seasonal cattle grazing, hunting, and hiking.

    CalRecycle’s Farm and Ranch Solid Waste Cleanup and Abatement Grant Program provides up to $1 million annually for the cleanup of illegal solid waste sites on farm or ranch property where the owner is not responsible for the illegal disposal. Under the program, cities, counties, federally recognized Native American tribes, and resource conservation districts may apply for up to $200,000 per fiscal year but no more than $50,000 per site. Grants are funded through the state’s Integrated Waste Management Account, Tire Recycling Management Fund, and Used Oil Recycling Fund.

    Get automatic updates on new grant cycles, awards, and funding availability by subscribing to CalRecycle’s Farm and Ranch Cleanup Grant listserv.

    Posted on In the Loop by Lance Klug on Nov 21, 2018

  • CalRecycle Monthly Public Meeting


    CalRecycle staff will provide a detailed update of the Beverage Container Recycling Fund at the department’s monthly public meeting on Tuesday.

    The most recent BCRF quarterly report projects a $36.8 million structural surplus for Fiscal Year 2018-2019, mostly attributable to fewer CRV redemptions. The surplus is expected to increase to $91.5 million for FY 2019-20.

    CalRecycle  will also consider awards for its Farm and Ranch cleanup program. Two jurisdictions are being considered for awards: Mariposa County Resource Conservation District, and the Resighini Rancheria. Eligible properties for these grants include those involving agricultural activities such as farms and ranches where the owner is not responsible for the illegal disposal. For more information see CalRecycle’s Farm and Ranch Solid Waste Cleanup and Abatement Grant Program webpage

    CalRecycle November 2018 Public Meeting
    10 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 19
    Byron Sher Auditorium, CalEPA Building
    1001 I St., Sacramento, CA

    You can find the full agenda for CalRecycle’s November public meeting here. If you can’t make it in person, join us by webcast (the link will go live shortly before the meeting begins).

    Posted on In the Loop on Nov 15, 2018

  • Putting Cap-and-Trade Dollars to Work for California

    CalRecycle’s greenhouse gas reduction grant and loan programs put Cap-and-Trade dollars to work for California by reducing greenhouse gas emissions, strengthening our economy, and improving public health and the environment—particularly in low-income and disadvantaged communities.

    Since 2014, CalRecycle has received $105 million from Cap-and-Trade funding. So far, funds have been funneled into three grant categories:

    • Food Waste Prevention and Rescue Grant Program—$9.38 million
    • Organics Grant Program—$72 million
    • Recycled Fiber, Plastic, and Glass Grant Program—$14 million

    You can read more about specific grant recipients and their efforts to help expand California’s recycling infrastructure in the “Putting Cap-and-Trade Dollars to Work for California” booklet.

    CalRecycle receives Cap-and-Trade funds to help California meet two statewide objectives: 

    • Reduce the amount of solid waste going to landfills by 75 percent by 2020 (AB 341)
    • Reduce the amount of organic material going to landfills by 75 percent by 2025 and recover at least 20 percent of disposed edible food by 2025 (SB 1383)

    California will need to move about 20 million tons a year out of the disposal stream to meet these goals. Regarding 75 percent organics recycling – a statewide mandate – CalRecycle estimates that roughly 50 to 100 new and expanded organics recycling facilities, at a cost of approximately $2 billion to $3 billion in capital investment, are needed to handle this amount of material.

    CalRecycle-funded organics recycling and digestion projects expand existing capacity or establish new facilities to reduce the amount of California-generated green materials and/or alternative daily cover sent to landfills. Landfilling of organics generates methane, a GHG about 80 times more potent than carbon dioxide over a 20 year horizon.

    Food Waste Prevention and Rescue projects (often run by food banks and food pantries) keep edible food out of landfills by reducing the amount of food waste that is generated or rescuing edible food from the waste stream.

    Recycled Fiber, Plastic, and Glass projects build or expand infrastructure for manufacturing products with recycled fiber (paper, textiles, carpet, or wood), plastic, or glass.

    Together, these programs are expanding the necessary infrastructure for California to manage our waste responsibly. As an added bonus, they also happen to be among the most cost-effective GHG grant programs in the state!

    Posted on In the Loop by Christina Files on Oct 8, 2018