How to Win at Videogaming? Recycle E-Waste!

 

Mario Brothers: How to win at videogaming? Recycle Electronic Waste!

 

Today is National Video Game Day. Did you know 57 percent of Americans play video games?

Maybe you used to play video games, or maybe you still do. Chances are you have games and consoles laying around that you haven’t played in some time. The nostalgic return of World of Warcraft Classic has some gamers realizing just how long they have had some games. Is it time to Marie-Kondo the collection? What should you do with games you’re not going to play anymore? Let’s take a look at the trash from one of our favorite pastimes.

What kind of waste is a video game console? E-waste! An easy way to think of e-waste is an item (or an accessory to the item) that has a battery or a power cord. Don’t forget to use the waste hierarchy: reduce, then reuse, then recycle. First, reduce the number of physical video games you purchase—more on that later. Second, reuse by selling functioning video games and consoles through used game retail shops like GameStop or social media platforms like Facebook, or you could go retro with eBay. Also consider giving away games to friends or family. Third, only if a console is not functioning should you consider recycling it or disposing of it by taking it to an e-waste drop-off location or scheduling an e-waste pickup. Check with your local city or county government for specific guidelines regarding the proper recycling or disposal of old video games and consoles.

What about the cartridge (or CD-ROM)? Cartridges used to store console video games, like those used with the original Nintendo and Sega Genesis, and have circuit boards made of plastic and metal components. Many of us fondly remember blowing the dust off the contacts if the console couldn’t read the game. The combination of crevices and different materials makes cartridges hard to recycle. Luckily, there are companies like TerraCycle with special collections for games and toys, including cartridges and CD-ROMs.

With the video game industry shifting new games toward digital downloads and online streaming, gamers are faced with fewer challenges to responsibly managing game cartridges at the end of their useful life.  Buying games online results in no packaging waste and no physical media or cartridge—which is a form of source reduction. And for those looking for a quick nostalgia fix, many older games have been made available on the Nintendo, Sony, and Xbox digital stores. The cloud for the (eco) win! 

— Victoria Ngo
Posted on Sep 12, 2019

Summary: What kind of waste is a video game console? E-waste! An easy way to think of e-waste is an item (or an accessory to the item) that has a battery or a power cord. Don’t forget to use the waste hierarchy: reduce, then reuse, then recycle.