Listed below are recent posts across all of CalRecyle's blogs.

  • Santa Barbara County Uses CalRecycle Grant Funds to Rebuild Roadway with Recycled Tires

     

    Santa Barbara County builds retaining wall with recycled tires

    How do you repurpose 81,000 recycled tires? Well, use them to create a new retaining wall, of course. 

    That’s what happened with a recent road stabilization project in Santa Barbara County.  This unique application utilized 810 tons of tire-derived aggregate to backfill a retaining wall composed of large, rock-filled, welded wire baskets called gabions. 

    In March 2018, CalRecycle awarded the county $158,241 in Tire-Derived Aggregate Grant Program funds to purchase the TDA material. 

    Prior to the project, failed soil in the embankment caused erosion to the old roadway and shoulder. The ongoing failure also created large cracks in the asphalt surface.

    But the new retaining wall is expected to have longer staying power due to the TDA material. UC San Diego researched the road repair technique and determined that TDA is seismically safe for retaining walls and for road repairs and will not degrade due to poor underlying soils or saturated conditions.

    For more information about this project, read our press release and watch our video, which includes some outstanding drone shots recorded by Santa Barbara County Public Works.  


    Santa Barbara TDA Roadway Repair Project YouTube

    Posted on In the Loop by Syd Fong on Aug 8, 2019

  • Our Audience Asks: What Is the 50/50/50 Rule?

    Our Audience Asks: What is the 50/50/50 Rule?

    Last week, I received a phone call from a fellow Californian and avid recycler asking about the 50/50/50 rule at recycling centers. For those of you who don’t know what that is, I’ll get to it shortly. After the call, I started wondering what people actually know about the Beverage Container Recycling Program regulations, California law, and rules made by recycling centers for operational efficiency. So, let’s clear up some confusion.

    California Refund Value (CRV)

    Most people know what this is, but just in case, here’s a refresher! CRV is the amount a customer pays when they purchase beverages in eligible containers like aluminum, plastic, and glass. You should see this amount on your store receipt. This amount is paid back to customers once they return the eligible containers to a certified recycling center or dealer (the place where you bought the container). The amount for each container is 5 cents for anything under 24 ounces and 10 cents for anything 24 ounces or greater.

    Certified Recycling Centers 

    Recycling centers are privately owned businesses that are certified by us, CalRecycle. And just like any other company, they’re in the business of making money, so you may have noticed some closing in recent years because it’s hard to turn a profit when global markets take a downward turn. These privately owned businesses are allowed to make certain rules about collecting recyclables for business operation efficiency, but they must follow certain regulations set by CalRecycle, and CalRecycle must follow the laws set by the State of California. That also means if you have a complaint or concern about a specific recycling center or dealer, you can call us at 1-800-Recycle to file a formal complaint. Our hotline staff really appreciate when you’re polite to them! I know because I sit right next to them and hear what they have to go through--it’s not always pretty. After your complaint is filed, our department will follow up with that center to resolve the issue. 

    50/50/50 Rule

    Recycling centers are allowed to pay by weight as a matter of business efficiency, but if you request to have the recycling center count each container so you can redeem the exact amount you paid, California law allows you that option. The recycling center is required to comply with that rule. But, in order to keep business moving, recyclers are only required to pay by “count” for 50 of each container type per visit, for a total of 150 CRV-eligible containers. If you bring more, they have the right to pay for the additional material by weight. And just to ensure the recycling center attendant and people in line behind you don’t roll their eyes at you, sort your containers ahead of time and let them know beforehand that you want to receive payment by count. 

    For more information about Beverage Container Recycling visit our FAQ page

    Posted on In the Loop by TC Clark on Aug 1, 2019

  • It's Easy Eating Green

    A Beginner’s Guide to a Plant-Based Diet

    It's Easy Eating Green: A Beginner's Guide to a Plant-Based Diet

    If you’ve been following any of my previous blogs, you already know I’ve been a lifelong environmentalist. From my stance on single-use straws and my drought-resistant landscape to my career at CalRecycle, I am a die-hard tree hugger!

    One subject I have not touched on yet is the environmental benefits of a plant-based diet. Although for me, it really had nothing to do with the environment (since there was little information about that back in the early '90s). It mostly had to do with my love of animals. If you read my straw blog, you’ll remember my dad taking me to fast food joints and refusing single-use plastic straws. It was in that same drive-through I learned that chicken nuggets came from chickens and burgers came from cows. Since then I have been conscious about the use of animal products, and the environmental advantages of not consuming meat were just a bonus.

    Reducing animal husbandry for food production can decrease carbon emissions, reduce meat and seafood waste byproducts, and significantly lower global fresh water use. Plus, eating more fruit and veggies is beneficial for your health! Here’s a primer on different types of less-meat diets. It’s a good idea to speak to a doctor or nutritionist before making a drastic change.

    Flexitarian

    Flexitarian: Being flexible with the amount of meat-free meals you eat daily or weekly

    As the name implies, flexitarians are flexible with the number of meat-free meals they choose to eat per week. It can be challenging to about-face your diet, so a flexitarian diet is a great way to slowly reduce your meat intake and replace it with plant-based proteins like legumes. When I became a vegetarian, it was a bit of an adjustment for my family members—the flexitarian diet allows you and your family to adjust without feeling like you’re being deprived of your favorite foods. It’s a great compromise for you and the planet.

    Vegetarian

    Vegetarian: Eating plant-based foods in addition to dairy, bread, and eggs

    I’d classify this as the intermediate diet—not too stringent, but not super-easy, either. This is where I’ve been for the past 23 years, and it works just fine for me. I eat mostly fruit, veggies, breads, dairy, and some meat substitutes like vegan “sausage” made from potatoes, apples, and spices. And because I live in California, it’s very easy to find multiple dishes at restaurants if I choose to eat out. If you are new to vegetarianism and are planning to eat at a new restaurant, always check the menu ahead of time to make sure you’re not caught off guard by a meat-filled menu. Additionally, if I ever get an order that includes meat by accident, I pick it off and give it to a friend or family member. There’s no use in sending it back or throwing it away—that’s just more waste!

    Vegan

    Vegan: Abstaining from eating or using any products produced by animals

    Personally, I find this diet too strict, but if it works, more power to you! Vegans exclude all animal products from their life—that means no animal byproduct foods or animal products like leather. It’s been hailed as the most eco-friendly and natural diet because no animals are raised, slaughtered, or eaten. However, other vegan products could be considered harmful to the planet, such as pleather clothing and accessories made from petroleum-based materials. And often “fake” animal product fashion doesn’t last as long as real leather, creating more waste. It may be worth considering using animal products when the alternative would be more harmful to the planet. (We never said the eco-warrior life was easy!)

    Not quite ready to give up your favorite burger joint? Ease into it with Meatless Mondays or find a method that works best for you. Protecting the environment is not a perfectly straight line—it’s a journey of finding what works for your lifestyle and the planet alike. As the saying goes, “We don’t need a handful of people doing zero waste perfectly. We need millions of people doing it imperfectly.” That works for other eco-friendly acts, too!

    Posted on In the Loop by TC Clark on Jun 13, 2019