Listed below are recent posts across all of CalRecyle's blogs.

  • How to Win at Videogaming? Recycle E-Waste!

     

    Mario Brothers: How to win at videogaming? Recycle Electronic Waste!

     

    Today is National Video Game Day. Did you know 57 percent of Americans play video games?

    Maybe you used to play video games, or maybe you still do. Chances are you have games and consoles laying around that you haven’t played in some time. The nostalgic return of World of Warcraft Classic has some gamers realizing just how long they have had some games. Is it time to Marie-Kondo the collection? What should you do with games you’re not going to play anymore? Let’s take a look at the trash from one of our favorite pastimes.

    What kind of waste is a video game console? E-waste! An easy way to think of e-waste is an item (or an accessory to the item) that has a battery or a power cord. Don’t forget to use the waste hierarchy: reduce, then reuse, then recycle. First, reduce the number of physical video games you purchase—more on that later. Second, reuse by selling functioning video games and consoles through used game retail shops like GameStop or social media platforms like Facebook, or you could go retro with eBay. Also consider giving away games to friends or family. Third, only if a console is not functioning should you consider recycling it or disposing of it by taking it to an e-waste drop-off location or scheduling an e-waste pickup. Check with your local city or county government for specific guidelines regarding the proper recycling or disposal of old video games and consoles.

    What about the cartridge (or CD-ROM)? Cartridges used to store console video games, like those used with the original Nintendo and Sega Genesis, and have circuit boards made of plastic and metal components. Many of us fondly remember blowing the dust off the contacts if the console couldn’t read the game. The combination of crevices and different materials makes cartridges hard to recycle. Luckily, there are companies like TerraCycle with special collections for games and toys, including cartridges and CD-ROMs.

    With the video game industry shifting new games toward digital downloads and online streaming, gamers are faced with fewer challenges to responsibly managing game cartridges at the end of their useful life.  Buying games online results in no packaging waste and no physical media or cartridge—which is a form of source reduction. And for those looking for a quick nostalgia fix, many older games have been made available on the Nintendo, Sony, and Xbox digital stores. The cloud for the (eco) win! 

    Posted on In the Loop by Victoria Ngo on Sep 12, 2019

  • Landfills: An Un-bear-able End for Stuffed Animals

    Landfills: An UnBEARable End for Stuffed Animals

    Like any full-grown adult woman, I love stuffed animals! OK, maybe not like any full-grown adult, but over the years I amassed a collection that would put a toy store to shame. And because I’ve watched Toy Story a few too many times, I believe our toys come to life when we’re not looking—I couldn’t possibly just throw them away!

    Several years ago, I finally faced the music and realized I needed to pare down my stuffed animal collection. Luckily, I live near a children’s hospital. I put all my new and gently used stuffed animals in a bag and brought them to the hospital—I was kind of a female version of Santa, but I didn’t wear a red suit. The hospital staff was very grateful! And, just like I gave toys to the children’s hospital that day, I’m going to give you some tips on how to donate or responsibly get rid of your old toys, or your children’s old toys.

    Make It a Game

    Get your kids involved in the paring-down process. If you explain that donating gently used toys to charity helps other children feel happiness and comfort, they will be happy to jump on board. Help your kids set a goal for how many toys they are willing to part with. It can be a great opportunity for children to learn compassion, how to waste less, and how to keep a tidy toy box. 

    When to Mend, When to Send (to the Trash)

    It’s best to figure out which toys are in good enough condition to pass along to someone else. If you have a broken or dirty toy, try to fix it and clean it. Your kids might realize they still want to play with it, but if it’s totally broken or beyond cleaning, it’s likely no one else wants it either. Sadly, it might be time to throw that toy away for good.

    Decisions, Decisions

    Decide which organization you’d like to donate your toys, stuffed animals, or games to. Check with places like the Goodwill, your local thrift shop, local shelters, preschools, churches, or hospitals. Always check with the organization first to find out what they do and do not accept before you drive up with a truck bed full of toys. Hospitals, in particular, often want brand-new toys for health/sanitary reasons. 

    Swap that Stuff

    Toys can also be recycled through special programs like the ones listed on Earth911.com, which is one of our favorite go-to environmental resources. Another idea is to set up a toy swap with kids at school, in your neighborhood, or with family members. It can be a fun way to get kids to share and trade for toys they want without you having to hit the store and spend money. 

    Final Thoughts

    Finally, remember why you’re donating toys in the first place: To help less fortunate children, prevent waste, and reduce clutter in your home. The purpose is not to just get rid of them, but rather thoughtfully pass them on.

    Resources:

    Stuffed Animals for Emergencies 

    Toys for Tots 

    Donation Town

     

    Posted on In the Loop by TC Clark on Sep 9, 2019

  • Zero Waste? Just a Picnic in the Park.

    CalRecycle staff sorting trash

     

    When CalRecycle staffers met up for the recent annual summer picnics, it was not all about the food and fun. Bragging rights were also up for grab between the Sacramento and Southern California employees.

    This was all about the zero waste competition to see which group of CalRecycle staffers created less waste at their picnic event.

    The social committees and zero waste team coordinated the competition, asking attendees to bring their reusable plates, utensils, and cups. Those who forgot to bring those items were able the rent a mess kit for $1.

    Each picnic event had stations for waste, compost, and recycling. Food waste was composted, excess food was donated to a local charity, and cans and plastic bottles were recycled.

    The remaining waste was weighed and divided by the number of attendees to come up with a comparable metric for the two picnics: per capita disposal, or the amount of waste per person.

    Now, on to the results. With a total of .011 lbs. of waste per person, the winner of the 2019 competition was … Southern California!

    Sacramento came oh-so-close with .013 lbs. of waste per person.

    In all, CalRecycle staff diverted 91.9 lbs. of waste from this year’s annual picnics, which is a major reduction from the 2018 total of 139.9 lbs. So, in many ways, everyone who participated was truly a winner.  

    Here’s video of the Sacramento picnic.When CalRecycle staffers met up for the recent annual summer picnics, it was not all about the food and fun. Bragging rights were also up for grab between the Sacramento and Southern California employees. Here’s video of the Sacramento picnic. 

     

    Zero waste picnic

     

    Posted on In the Loop by Syd Fong on Sep 5, 2019